UNCTAD sees potential for creative economy in Cambodia

The creative economy is one of the fastest growing sectors in the world and creative industries create jobs and incomes, promote innovation and contribute to the well-being of societies, said the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) in its latest Creative Economy Outlook 2022. .

Cambodia also participated in UNCTAD’s 2021 Creative Economy Survey.

Speaking about the potential of the creative economy, Rebeca Grynspan, Secretary-General of UNCTAD, said: “More data and innovative, multidisciplinary policy responses are needed to strengthen the impacts of the creative sector on development. This is essential, as the creative economy offers all countries, especially developing economies, a feasible option for development.

The report provides an overview of UNCTAD’s survey of member States on the creative economy by highlighting institutional arrangements and national plans and strategies for 33 countries.

“Global exports of creative goods accounted for $524 million in 2020, while global exports of creative services reached $1.1 trillion. Furthermore, UNCTAD estimates that in 2020, creative goods and services accounted for 3% and 21% of total exports of goods and services, respectively,” Grynspan said.

The results show how the creative economy has become a sector of growing social, political and economic importance. International trade in creative goods and services generates growing revenues for countries, but exports of creative services far exceed those of creative goods.

The study indicates that most of the responding countries have established a specific national strategy or plan to support and develop creative industries at the national level. Among responding countries, Cambodia, Central African Republic, Honduras, Latvia and Trinidad and Tobago were the fastest to recognize the social, economic and political importance of the creative economy, he said. , adding, “They developed national strategies and plans to develop their creative industries from the mid-2000s to the mid-2010s.”

Most of the responding countries have established a specific national strategy or plan to support and develop creative industries at the national level. Among responding countries, Cambodia, Central African Republic, Honduras, Latvia, and Trinidad and Tobago were among the first to develop national strategies and plans to develop their creative industries from the mid-2000s to the mid-1990s. 2010, he said.

Giving examples of national strategies and plans for the creative economy in Cambodia, the study highlighted that the Ministry of Culture and Fine Arts Strategic Plan 2019-2023 focuses on increasing conservation and development of cultural heritage to attract national and international tourists.

The plan focuses on promoting Cambodia to become a center for performing arts and cultural products, and a place for foreign film productions; create employment opportunities in the field of culture; support and encourage new creation in all fields such as music, audiovisual, cinema, publishing, performing arts, crafts, painting, traditional weaving, design and architecture; organization of festivals for exhibitions of new creative works and products of the cultural and creative industries.

The plan also aims to expand the market and cultural products by promoting creativity and innovation in music, film, visual arts, crafts, traditional weaving and design among artists and producers, the report adds.

Other countries that participated in the survey are Andorra, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Belgium, Benin, Canada, Central African Republic, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Georgia, Germany, Guatemala, Honduras, Latvia, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Myanmar. , Nicaragua, Oman, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Russian Federation, Slovenia, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkey and United Arab Emirates.

“Trade in creative goods and services generates growing revenues for countries, but exports of creative services far exceed those of creative goods. Global exports of creative goods have grown from $419 million in 2010 to $524 million in 2020, while global exports of creative services have grown from $487 billion to nearly $1.1 trillion over the past year. the same period. Exports of creative goods and services have decoupled in recent years, driven by a sharp increase in exports of software and research and development services and a so-called “dematerialization” of some creative goods (due to digitization, certain goods are becoming more and more creative services). Another factor is that the statistical capture of detailed service subcategories has improved significantly in recent years,” the report points out.

  • Key words: creative economy, UNCTAD

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