Guatemala tourism – IPMS Guatemala http://ipmsguatemala.org/ Thu, 29 Sep 2022 05:58:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://ipmsguatemala.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-61-120x120.png Guatemala tourism – IPMS Guatemala http://ipmsguatemala.org/ 32 32 Global pacts on green tourism vital for sustainability, says London summit https://ipmsguatemala.org/global-pacts-on-green-tourism-vital-for-sustainability-says-london-summit/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 06:31:51 +0000 https://ipmsguatemala.org/global-pacts-on-green-tourism-vital-for-sustainability-says-london-summit/ LONDON: Tourism and hospitality leaders from around the world have gathered for a summit in the UK capital to explore ways to manage, operate and grow a reliable and reliable tourism and hospitality industry. sustainable with an emphasis on reducing environmental damage. On Friday, delegates to the RESET Sustainably: Tourism, Hospitality and Travel Summit, organized […]]]>

LONDON: Tourism and hospitality leaders from around the world have gathered for a summit in the UK capital to explore ways to manage, operate and grow a reliable and reliable tourism and hospitality industry. sustainable with an emphasis on reducing environmental damage.

On Friday, delegates to the RESET Sustainably: Tourism, Hospitality and Travel Summit, organized by UK hospitality and tourism development company TLC Harmony, discussed several critical sustainability issues, including economic impact, biodiversity, on-chain payments, marketing and the nature of women’s economic power in choosing a vacation destination.

Dr Omar Al-Attas, environmental sustainability manager at the Red Sea Development Company, said it was important to attend such summits with the aim of sharing, inspiring and learning at the same time.

“We are working on so many different levels, and we have reached great levels that we would like to share with the rest of the world,” he told Arab News. “Protecting the environment of this world cannot be the mandate of a single entity or a single country, it is a collaborative work for all of us to be able to achieve this goal.”

The environmental sustainability manager at the Red Sea Development Company, Dr Omar Al-Atta, said their projects ensure that all pillars of sustainability are integrated at every level. (A photo)

Al-Attas said he shared the efforts of the Red Sea Project since its inception, which aimed to ensure that all pillars of sustainability were integrated at every level. The company has also commissioned several environmental studies to assess different types of ecosystems so it can monitor and protect them, he added.

“We have identified all types of coral reefs, as well as the health and varieties thereof all around the lagoons, and very soon we will be releasing our data for the Amala destination as well,” he said. , referring to the land and real estate megaproject that is part of Saudi Vision 2030.

Al-Attas said he has identified more than 240 species of fish, as well as dolphins and dugongs, to ensure that development projects do not affect “all the beautiful parts of this ecosystem”. In addition to focusing on marine life, their studies have also identified over 25,000 birds in the area.

“For the Red Sea Development Company, we have ensured that we are definitely aligned with the Saudi vision in all its pillars, with regard to regenerative tourism, and also with regard to the environment, as well as the social implications” , did he declare. .


RESET Sustainably Summit delegates speak at one of the panel discussions at the Hyatt Regency Churchill Hotel in London. (A photo)

“If you talk about the Saudi green initiatives, we now have multiple initiatives within this program, from the protection of the land navy (life), where what we do within our surveillance system, how can we also work in (the) announcement of marine protected areas in our lagoons and beyond to help us achieve all of these goals,” he said.

The Red Sea Development Company’s model is aligned with the goals of the Saudi government and those of the UN’s 17 Sustainable Development Goals, he said.

“We cannot work alone, we must work together in a collaborative way and also exchange information, knowledge, efforts and achievements. This will help all of us achieve the goals we have set for ourselves, which is to protect this globe and this world and the environment,” Al-Attas said.

The first RESET Summit was held in May last year as the world emerged from COVID-19. The tourism industry, which accounts for 10% of global GDP, has been hit hard by the pandemic and around 200 million people have lost their jobs, said Nicki Page, founder of TLC.


TLC Harmony founder Nicki Page spoke about the nature of women’s economic power in determining vacation destination. (A photo)

“We felt we had to do something, and while we didn’t have the set up to make RESET a global annual event, that seems to be where it’s going,” she said, adding that this year, they had speakers from all over the world, including Saudi Arabia, Germany, Denmark and Guatemala.

TLC launched the Greenhouse Gas and Biodiversity Impact Measurement Tool, or GABI, and the Planet Tip at the summit, which support the measurement of hospitality and operational delivery of hotels through the main climate impact indicators. This places a financial value of the impact per hotel night, per dinner or per product or service.

“The tool gives real economic value to the harm it has done to nature, and we’re just asking that we put some of that back, and that the ‘Planet Tip’ allows a consumer, along with the company, to teaming up on a journey to make us kind to nature, because we definitely love to travel, and we definitely don’t want to stop enjoying beautiful places and beautiful hotels,” Page said.

She said one of the sessions focused on women, as they usually choose where the family goes on vacation and it was important to understand their role in choosing a sustainable trip.

Marilu Sicoli, senior partner at London-based architecture firm Foster + Partners, spoke about the unique nature-inspired megaprojects they have been working on with the Red Sea Development Company since 2018.

She highlighted their work on the island of Shurayrah, one of 22 out of more than 90 that is being rehabilitated as part of their master plan. She also spoke about the work being done at the Southern Dunes, one of two inland hotels in the desert and close to the Red Sea, as well as progress being made on Ummahat Al-Shaykh, which is another hotel complex with super luxurious villas.

“We’ve been very busy in that sense, and we’ve really tried to keep the vision and the touch light in all these beautiful venues,” Sicoli said.

She added that architecture within the framework of sustainable development was “absolutely key to everything and good design is certainly the key to succeeding in this incredible and ambitious operation that the Red Sea is proposing, so I think we had a lot of lucky to be part of that, and our designs definitely fulfill that ambition.

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TTG – Features – Dive Deeper into Belize’s Ecotourism Activities https://ipmsguatemala.org/ttg-features-dive-deeper-into-belizes-ecotourism-activities/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://ipmsguatemala.org/ttg-features-dive-deeper-into-belizes-ecotourism-activities/ Mary Ann Haslam Sub-editor The slight shiver in the air gives me goosebumps as we wade waist deep in an underground river, eyes wide as we admire the magnificent shimmering stalactites and stalagmites. “Do you want to see without the light? asks our guide, causing nervous gasps among our motley group of amateur cavers. “Let’s […]]]>

The slight shiver in the air gives me goosebumps as we wade waist deep in an underground river, eyes wide as we admire the magnificent shimmering stalactites and stalagmites. “Do you want to see without the light? asks our guide, causing nervous gasps among our motley group of amateur cavers. “Let’s turn off our headlights,” he says and we dutifully obey until, click, the last light goes out.

I try desperately to see – in vain. It is dark and all I hear is the gentle murmur of the stream. I expect claustrophobia to hit, but instead a strong sense of peace and calm comes over me, like I’ve been meditating all day and not just, in fact, doing hiking and climbing on rocks for almost three hours.

It must be the magical effect of the Actun Tunichil Muknal, better known as the ATM Cave, a vast geological wonder in Belize used by the ancient Mayan people as a sacred burial ground. Today it is a museum and houses Mayan artifacts and the skeletal remains of human sacrifices, including the Crystal Maiden, the most intact of them all.

This mystical excursion may be more adventurous, but those who dare will be rewarded with a unique and ethereal experience – a fitting introduction to small but mighty Belize.

The entrance to ATM Cave, which houses ancient Mayan artifacts

The entrance to ATM Cave, which houses ancient Mayan artifacts

Protect and preserve

On the natural side, this South American nation packs a punch. On land, 61.1% of unexploited land the tropical forest extends over the country, while its the coastline has about 200 miles of unspoilt barrier reef – the second largest after Australia’s – and is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. So it’s really important to know why conservation is a priority.

“Sustainability is something that is ingrained in our societal DNA,” says Debbie Gilharry-Arana, travel industry specialist at the Belize Tourism Board. “We have always been a destination that protects our natural resources. Over 40% of our land mass is protected as national parks, wildlife sanctuaries and reserves; we were already ahead of the game with this even before Covid.

One of the latest eco-initiatives is the Wit Concrete site in the Turneffe Atoll Marine Reserve, 20 miles east of Belize City. To get a glimpse, we head from our rainforest haven Hidden Valley Inn to our new base on Caye Caulker, a laid-back little island where you’re encouraged to “go slow” and walk around without shoes. Even our hotel is called Barefoot Caye Caulker.

Wit Concrete is a 375ft World War II ship formerly used for transporting sugar, which has been sunk and reincarnated as a home for marine life and a major new attraction for diving enthusiasts.

The Turneffe Atoll Sustainability Association manages the project. Valdemar Executive Director Andrade says: “By choosing to go to Turneffe, customers are not only on vacation, they are contributing towards the conservation of marine biodiversity and the preservation of one of the best places on earth.

Belize's crystal-clear waters are a major draw for divers. (Phil Rudin)

Belize’s crystal-clear waters are a major draw for divers. (Phil Rudin)

The Xunantunich archaeological site features buildings dating back to 400 AD

The Xunantunich archaeological site features buildings dating back to 400 AD

Unfortunately for us, rough seas ruined our chances of visiting the site. But we could still follow the fins of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, who earlier this year went diving in Belize and hailed the country’s commitment to protect 30% of its marine environment by 2030.

The next day we depart with Ragga Sailing Adventures to explore the Hol Chan Marine Reserve. Along the way, we learn that every tourist boat must register to be checked at the marine station. If you were a big ship dropping anchor on the reef you would be slapped with a £400,000 fine.

Like ATM Cave, snorkeling here feels like an otherworldly experience. No wonder Hol Chan is considered one of the best sites for this, as we come face to face with not only three different species of snapper, hogfish and barracuda, but also green sea turtles, nurse sharks the friendliest and acres of beautiful pristine coral gardens. .

Hidden Valley Inn is located on the Mountain Pine Ridge Reservation

Hidden Valley Inn is located on the Mountain Pine Ridge Reservation

Seen from above

The highlight for me, however, was not in the water but in the air. Heading towards Lighthouse Reef Atoll is the enigmatic Great Blue Hole, a huge limestone sinkhole 300 meters wide and 125 meters deep that can be seen from space. Our flyover tower soars high and low in gentle figures of eight, ensuring the best views of the natural phenomenon, which adorns the coral reef like a sapphire brooch. Divers are also drawn here by its surprisingly clear waters, allowing maximum visibility of its myriad cave formations and peek-a-boo marine life.

Back on land, there’s plenty to explore, but a visit to Belize wouldn’t be complete without paying homage to the ancient civilization that preceded it – the Maya.

One of the greatest examples from their reign can be explored at the Xunantunich archaeological site. Originally built in 400 AD on a limestone ridge, over the centuries it has become a sprawling complex comprising six plazas and 25 temples, the tallest of which is El Castillo, or The Castle, which stands at 40 meters. It’s worth climbing the steep steps to get a closer look at the intricate carved friezes on either side, said to depict astrological symbols. At the platform, I take in the unparalleled views and gaze out over Guatemala in the distance. I feel like I’m on top of the world.

As the breeze blows, goose bumps sting my arms and that familiar feeling of absolute serenity washes over me. I think I know what it is now. It must be Mayan magic.

To book: Journey Latin America offers a six-day vacation in Belize, staying two nights B&B at Hidden Valley Inn and three nights B&B at Barefoot on Caye Caulker from £1,580 pp. The price includes international flights, transfers and excursions. travellatinamerica.com

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Joplin sees post-pandemic rebound in tourism https://ipmsguatemala.org/joplin-sees-post-pandemic-rebound-in-tourism/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 10:52:00 +0000 https://ipmsguatemala.org/joplin-sees-post-pandemic-rebound-in-tourism/ September 14 – Joplin’s post-pandemic tourism numbers appear to be rebounding. Patrick Tuttle, director of the Joplin Convention and Visitors Bureau, said about 21,000 international visitors came to town in 2021 and spent $4.2 million while there. These are the numbers from a recent report provided to the office by VISA Destination Insights. The estimates […]]]>

September 14 – Joplin’s post-pandemic tourism numbers appear to be rebounding.

Patrick Tuttle, director of the Joplin Convention and Visitors Bureau, said about 21,000 international visitors came to town in 2021 and spent $4.2 million while there.

These are the numbers from a recent report provided to the office by VISA Destination Insights. The estimates are based on data derived from Visa credit card spending, Tuttle said at a recent city council meeting.

Canada topped the list of international visitors with over 16,700 visitors who, in total, contributed nearly $1.7 million to the local economy. Next is Mexico, with about 2,400 travelers who spent nearly $842,000 in Joplin.

There were over 100 visitors each from Guatemala, the UK, Japan and mainland China, who spent a total of around $630,000. Nearly 300 visitors came from Germany, Guam and Honduras, spending around $200,000.

Tuttle noted that there was one visitor each from Armenia and Tanzania, who each spent $4, the lowest amount of the 103 countries represented in the report.

Kansas City, St. Louis, Hannibal and St. Joseph also participated in the data collection report.

Tuttle said the report shows more than 213,000 international visitors visited Missouri last year, generating more than $162 million in revenue.

Joplin has been involved in the investigation for five years. Tuttle said the pandemic had temporarily reduced the numbers seen.

In the survey’s first year, 2017, Joplin’s credit card charges reflected the attendance of 20,000 visitors who spent approximately $5.5 million.

“In 2020, the pandemic had an impact, but 2021 is a good bounce back from there,” Tuttle said.

It sees a mix of international visitors so far this year. Those who have entered the register of the Tourist and Convention Bureau are those who have come from the United Kingdom, Spain, Portugal, Greece and Switzerland. Recently, three tour buses with guests from the UK stopped in Joplin and were greeted by Mayor Doug Lawson.

Additionally, there have been domestic travelers from all 50 states so far this year.

A portion of tourism revenue goes to the Joplin Convention and Visitors Bureau through a 4% hotel and motel tax.

“That’s an incredible number of people coming to town and being welcomed by our citizens,” Tuttle said. “We’ve looked at the listings, and it’s not all Route 66 visitors. Many are here for industry. We have Canadian-based companies and Brazil-based industries” bringing people to Joplin for business. .

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Joplin sees post-pandemic rebound in tourism | Local News https://ipmsguatemala.org/joplin-sees-post-pandemic-rebound-in-tourism-local-news/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 00:30:00 +0000 https://ipmsguatemala.org/joplin-sees-post-pandemic-rebound-in-tourism-local-news/ Joplin’s post-pandemic tourism numbers appear to be rebounding. Patrick Tuttle, director of the Joplin Convention and Visitors Bureau, said about 21,000 international visitors came to town in 2021 and spent $4.2 million while there. These are the numbers from a recent report provided to the office by VISA Destination Insights. The estimates are based on […]]]>

Joplin’s post-pandemic tourism numbers appear to be rebounding.

Patrick Tuttle, director of the Joplin Convention and Visitors Bureau, said about 21,000 international visitors came to town in 2021 and spent $4.2 million while there.

These are the numbers from a recent report provided to the office by VISA Destination Insights. The estimates are based on data derived from Visa credit card spending, Tuttle said at a recent city council meeting.

Canada topped the list of international visitors with over 16,700 visitors who, in total, contributed nearly $1.7 million to the local economy. Next is Mexico, with about 2,400 travelers who spent nearly $842,000 in Joplin.

There were over 100 visitors each from Guatemala, the UK, Japan and mainland China, who spent a total of around $630,000. Nearly 300 visitors came from Germany, Guam and Honduras, spending around $200,000.

Tuttle noted that there was one visitor each from Armenia and Tanzania, who each spent $4, the lowest amount of the 103 countries represented in the report.

Kansas City, St. Louis, Hannibal and St. Joseph also participated in the data collection report.

Tuttle said the report shows more than 213,000 international visitors visited Missouri last year, generating more than $162 million in revenue.

Joplin has been involved in the investigation for five years. Tuttle said the pandemic had temporarily reduced the numbers seen.

In the survey’s first year, 2017, Joplin’s credit card charges reflected the attendance of 20,000 visitors who spent approximately $5.5 million.

“In 2020, the pandemic had an impact, but 2021 is a good bounce back from there,” Tuttle said.

It sees a mix of international visitors so far this year. Those who have entered the register of the Tourist and Convention Bureau are those who have come from the United Kingdom, Spain, Portugal, Greece and Switzerland. Recently, three tour buses with guests from the UK stopped in Joplin and were greeted by Mayor Doug Lawson.

Additionally, there have been domestic travelers from all 50 states so far this year.

A portion of tourism revenue enters the Joplin Convention and Visitors Bureau through a 4% hotel and motel tax.

“That’s an incredible number of people coming to town and being welcomed by our citizens,” Tuttle said. “We looked at the listings, and it’s not all of the Route 66 visitors. Many are here for the industry. We have Canadian-based companies and Brazil-based industries” bringing people to Joplin for business.

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UAE’s first-half tourism revenue hits $5 billion https://ipmsguatemala.org/uaes-first-half-tourism-revenue-hits-5-billion/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://ipmsguatemala.org/uaes-first-half-tourism-revenue-hits-5-billion/ Vision 2030 policies ensure Saudi Arabia will become 60% more resilient to oil shocks by 2030: KAPSARC RIYADH: Saudi Arabia’s economy is expected to become 60% more resilient to oil shocks by 2030, according to a study published by the King Abdullah Petroleum Studies and Research Center, a Riyadh-based advisory think tank. “What we mean […]]]>

Vision 2030 policies ensure Saudi Arabia will become 60% more resilient to oil shocks by 2030: KAPSARC

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia’s economy is expected to become 60% more resilient to oil shocks by 2030, according to a study published by the King Abdullah Petroleum Studies and Research Center, a Riyadh-based advisory think tank.

“What we mean by resilient is how this economy can withstand shocks and recover quickly and quickly after the shock at the same level of growth or even better, and we have found that by implementing the policies of Vision 2030, the Saudi economy will be 60 percent more resilient to shocks by 2030,” Hossa Almutairi, researcher at KAPSARC and co-author of the study told Arab News.

Almutairi pointed out that an advanced economy is driven by household spending, and when households have a clear vision of the future, they invest even more in it.

“In a more stable economy, you have a stable income. It’s harder to plan for the future if you don’t know what’s going to happen and if you’re not sure about the future,” she said.

Almutairi believes that a stable economy will also translate into growing business demand, saying, “It’s a continuous cycle that will affect household incomes and job creation.”

The study indicates that economic reforms will make Saudi household consumption 40% less volatile.

According to a report by the International Monetary Fund, the Kingdom is expected to be one of the fastest growing economies in the world this year, thanks to sweeping business-friendly reforms and a sharp rise in oil prices as well as to the recovery of productive power after a pandemic-induced recession in 2020.

Gross domestic product is expected to rise 7.6%, the fastest growth in nearly a decade, the IMF reported.

According to Almutairi, much of this growth was due to growing oil revenues as well as increased government spending.

“This growth is driven by activity in the oil sector, and government spending also increased by 10% in the first quarter of 2022, compared to the same period in 2021,” she said.

Oil revenue for the first half of 2022 was SR434 billion ($115.7 billion), compared to SR248.7 billion in the first half of 2021, an increase of 75%, according to Zawya.

Non-oil revenues have also increased by 5% this year, Almutairi said, which aligns with the Kingdom’s long-term economic diversification goals.

“The non-oil sector contributed to the growth and you see non-oil revenue was up 5%,” she said.

According to Almutairi, oil will remain a major economic resource for the Kingdom as the economic reforms of Saudi Vision 2030 are not about abandoning oil but rather focusing on diversifying the economy.

“In the most ambitious scenario for climate change, which is the International Energy Agency’s net zero scenario that was released last year, oil will remain at 24 million barrels per day in 2050. The So the world still needs oil, and Saudi Arabia has some of the lowest oil production costs. What I mean is that oil will be part of economic activities,” she said. .

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“Rethinking Tourism”: the sector prepares to celebrate World Tourism Day 2022 – English version https://ipmsguatemala.org/rethinking-tourism-the-sector-prepares-to-celebrate-world-tourism-day-2022-english-version/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://ipmsguatemala.org/rethinking-tourism-the-sector-prepares-to-celebrate-world-tourism-day-2022-english-version/ The countdown to World Tourism Day 2022 is now underway, with every part of the sector invited to actively participate in the annual celebrations. With the theme “Rethinking Tourism”, the International Day of Commemoration this year will focus on reimagining the growth of the sector, both in terms of size and relevance. The Republic of […]]]>

The countdown to World Tourism Day 2022 is now underway, with every part of the sector invited to actively participate in the annual celebrations.

With the theme “Rethinking Tourism”, the International Day of Commemoration this year will focus on reimagining the growth of the sector, both in terms of size and relevance. The Republic of Indonesia will host the official day (September 27), although all UNWTO Member States, as well as non-members and stakeholders across the private sector, are encouraged to hold their own celebrations. as well as to promote the day and its central theme.

The potential for tourism is enormous and we have a shared responsibility to ensure that it is fully realized.

UNWTO Secretary-General Zurab Pololikashvili said: “The potential for tourism is enormous and we have a shared responsibility to ensure that it is fully realised. On World Tourism Day 2022, UNWTO calls on everyone, from tourism workers to tourists themselves, as well as small businesses, large corporations and governments, to reflect and rethink what we do and how we do it.

World Tourism Day has been held on September 27 every year since 1980. This date marks the anniversary of the adoption of the Organization’s Statutes in 1970, paving the way for the establishment of UNWTO five years later.

Source: MTM.

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Dominican Tourism Revenue Exceeds $931.0 Million – English Version https://ipmsguatemala.org/dominican-tourism-revenue-exceeds-931-0-million-english-version/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://ipmsguatemala.org/dominican-tourism-revenue-exceeds-931-0-million-english-version/ The arrival of tourists in July in the Dominican Republic had a direct impact on the economy, as it represented $931 million in foreign currency inflows. These are the figures managed by the Ministry of Tourism and which were published yesterday by David Collado. The United States remains in the lead as a source of […]]]>

The arrival of tourists in July in the Dominican Republic had a direct impact on the economy, as it represented $931 million in foreign currency inflows.

These are the figures managed by the Ministry of Tourism and which were published yesterday by David Collado.

The United States remains in the lead as a source of tourists, followed by Canada, Colombia, Puerto Rico, Spain, Cuba and the United Kingdom.

Collado gives as fact that this year 2022 will close with the arrival of more than seven million tourists, “thereby achieving the best year of tourism in its history, thanks to the vision that has been implemented from the State by the President Luis Abinader, as well as the cooperation of the private sector and all the collaborators of the ministry.

The Dominican Republic welcomed 735,064,000 tourists in July, according to David Collado

Tourism Minister David Collado informed that the Dominican Republic received 735,064 thousand non-resident visitors in July, making it the month with the highest tourist arrivals in the country’s history, surpassing December 2021.

Collado indicated that this new achievement should close the year beating for the first time in history the figure of more than 7 million tourists, and said that with this month of July 2022, the arrivals of non-resident visitors represent 10% more than in July 2018, 24% above July 2019 and 30% above the same month of 2021.

“We did it again. We achieved an extraordinary month of tourist arrivals in the Dominican Republic,” said Collado, referring to the record figure reached in July in visitor arrivals compared to the same month in previous years. “July 2022 becomes, along with December 2021, the only months in history where we exceed 700,000 tourists in one month,” he added.

Minister Collado pointed out that in addition to these 734,000 visitors by air, another 98,389 cruise passengers arrived in the country in July and that, cumulatively, the country has more than 4 million 182,000 tourists so far this year.

He said that the arrival of these tourists last month has directly impacted the economy since it represented 739 million dollars of foreign currency inflows.

The United States continues to dominate as the country of origin for tourists, followed by Canada, Colombia, Puerto Rico, Spain, Cuba and the United Kingdom.

Minister Collado reaffirmed that this year will close with the arrival of more than 7 million tourists, “thus achieving the best tourist year in its history, thanks to the vision that has been implemented from the State by the President Luis Abinader, as well as the cooperation of the private sector and all the collaborators of the ministry. (https://dominicantoday.com/dr/tourism/2022/08/01/the-dominican-republic-received-735064-thousand-tourists-in-july-says-david-collado/)

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Government prepares tourist packages for cities hosting the U-20 World Cup https://ipmsguatemala.org/government-prepares-tourist-packages-for-cities-hosting-the-u-20-world-cup/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 11:18:51 +0000 https://ipmsguatemala.org/government-prepares-tourist-packages-for-cities-hosting-the-u-20-world-cup/ There are six sites in six cities that will be used, namely Bali as the main destination, South Sumatra, West Java, Central Java, Jakarta and Surabaya. We will prepare organized trips for the regions. Jakarta (ANTARA) – Tourism and Creative Economy Minister Sandiaga Uno has said his ministry is preparing tourism packages for six cities […]]]>

There are six sites in six cities that will be used, namely Bali as the main destination, South Sumatra, West Java, Central Java, Jakarta and Surabaya. We will prepare organized trips for the regions.

Jakarta (ANTARA) – Tourism and Creative Economy Minister Sandiaga Uno has said his ministry is preparing tourism packages for six cities that will host the U-20 World Cup in 2023.

“There are six locations in six cities that will be used, namely Bali as the main destination, South Sumatra, West Java, Central Java, Jakarta and Surabaya. We will prepare tour packages for the regions,” Uno said at Merdeka Palace. , here, Thursday.

Based on Presidential Instruction Number 8 of 2020 regarding support for the implementation of the 2021 FIFA U-20 World Cup, which has been postponed to 2023, six stadiums will be ready to host matches: the Bung Karno Main Stadium (Jakarta), Jakabaring Stadium (Palembang, South Sumatra), Si Jalak Harupat Stadium (Bandung, West Java), Manahan Stadium (Surakarta, Central Java), Gelora Bung Tomo Stadium (Surabaya, Java eastern) and Captain I Wayan Dipta Stadium (Gianyar, Bali).

Related News: Ministry to Hold Big 50 Tourism Village Awards in Campaga

President Joko Widodo (Jokowi) has directed the Ministry of Tourism and Creative Economy to prepare premium tourism promotions, pre- and side-events and creative economy products as Indonesia has been designated to host the international soccer event, Uno informed.

The minister said he has prepared a number of tourist destinations for the World Cup, including Bromo Tengger Semeru National Park in East Java region, Borobudur Temple in Central Java region, natural tourism and culinary in West Java, as well as history-based tourism. and leather crafts in South Sumatra.

“This includes our digital marketing approach to leverage this event for our destination tourism promotion as well as our creative economy products,” he added.

Related News: BKSS South Sumatra to Showcase 200 Creative Economy Enterprises

Earlier, Youth and Sports Minister Zainudin Amali informed that the U-20 World Cup was to be held from May 20 to June 11, 2023 and will feature 24 participating countries including the host, Indonesia.

So far, nine other countries have qualified for the 2023 World Cup finals: Dominican Republic, Guatemala, Honduras, United States, England, France, Israel, Italy and Slovakia.

The event was supposed to take place in 2021, but was postponed by FIFA due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Related News: Watch Indonesian Dramas Not Just South Koreans: Uno to Citizens

Related News: Visa-on-arrival scheme boosts foreign tourist visits: minister

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Santa Cruz, Belize: Mayan village fights to preserve traditions as tourism looms https://ipmsguatemala.org/santa-cruz-belize-mayan-village-fights-to-preserve-traditions-as-tourism-looms/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 14:56:16 +0000 https://ipmsguatemala.org/santa-cruz-belize-mayan-village-fights-to-preserve-traditions-as-tourism-looms/ (CNN) — A bumpy 10-passenger plane ride from Belize City takes you over verdant jungles, rugged peaks, and scrabble along the vibrant Caribbean Sea, dotted with idyllic atolls, before landing on a airport to a strip, a touch of dusty red in the middle of thick treetops. This is the airport in Punta Gorda, the […]]]>

(CNN) — A bumpy 10-passenger plane ride from Belize City takes you over verdant jungles, rugged peaks, and scrabble along the vibrant Caribbean Sea, dotted with idyllic atolls, before landing on a airport to a strip, a touch of dusty red in the middle of thick treetops.

This is the airport in Punta Gorda, the southernmost town in Belize, which has a population of 5,000.

It’s remote, but it’s a bustling metropolis compared to Santa Cruz, a Mayan settlement that’s a 50-minute walk inland. The humidity greets you like a warm embrace and the bustling jungle wildlife provides a looping soundtrack of birdsong, monkey howls and the occasional roar.

It is here, nestled in the safety of the jungle, that the Mopan Maya live. Originally from Belize and Guatemala, the Mopans are one of the 28 ethnic subgroups of the Maya people. About 10,000 people in Belize identify as Mopan, representing less than 3% of the country’s population. Culture is therefore closely protected by its people.

Belize was home to some of the earliest Maya settlements, and today the Maya make up around 11% of the country’s population.

Santa Cruz is accessed by a rough, unpaved road that winds through the mountains to open into a small valley. Here, tight-knit communities living in thatched-roof dwellings grow corn, potatoes and cocoa.

It is a way of life that has remained almost unchanged for centuries, partly by choice and partly by circumstance. Their very existence revolves around a daily communion with nature, their routines dictated by the seasons.

Santa Cruz is a Mopan Maya community in southern Belize.

Courtesy of Lucy Sherriff

Balancing change with tradition

“We live in harmony with the Earth, the sun, the rain”, explains Jose Mes, one of the community leaders of Santa Cruz.

He wakes up to the crow of the family rooster and his days depend on what needs to be done at that time of year. Maybe he’s helping a neighbor cover his roof, harvest corn, or plant seeds for the fall. Their way of life is determined by earth and sky, which can be a blessing and a curse, especially now that they are surviving in a world ruled by technology.

Despite this, the delivery of electricity to the remote area has been slow. The village, like several others nearby, is far from the national power grid, making it logistically difficult and costly to electrify their communities. “We have solar panels on some houses,” says Mes, “but it’s rare.”

Electricity comes with its own set of challenges.

Jose Mes explains how plants are used for their medicinal properties.

Jose Mes explains how plants are used for their medicinal properties.

Courtesy of Lucy Sherriff

“Our way of life here is very sheltered from the rest of the world,” says Mes. “We’ve had to fight hard to protect our lands and our homes here, and as the world changes rapidly, it’s getting even harder to do so.”

Bringing electricity to the village will undoubtedly make their lives easier, but could in turn threaten their traditions.

In Mes’s house, a large circular structure topped with a reed-woven roof, his wife tends to a small fire while she tears off palm-sized pieces from a large ball of corn dough. White. She deftly uses the heel of her hand to shape the dough into a tortilla, alternating with her fingertips to perfect the shape.

When Mes opens his home to tourists, which he does with careful planning and the help of Bruno Kuppinger, a German tour guide who has worked in Belize for 25 years, he is keen to offer them an immersion into the daily life of his community.

Visitors are invited to lift the impossibly heavy pestle to grind corn, shape it into dough, and try their hand at shaping tortillas, a surprisingly complex task for untrained fingertips. Mes takes his guests on a culinary exploration of everything he grows: cocoa, beans, chilies, to name a few, all pure, unrefined and straight from the earth.

The women of the community prepare food from what is grown on the land, including corn tortillas, which are eaten at almost every meal.

The women of the community prepare food from what is grown on the land, including corn tortillas, which are eaten at almost every meal.

Courtesy of Lucy Sherriff

Fears of uncontrolled tourism

Mes and his family benefit from the arrival of tourists to their home, but they are also aware of the pitfalls.

Tourism accounts for approximately 41% of Belize’s GDP, so it is vital that it is developed consciously and in collaboration with local communities.

“We are not convinced that we will be protected by the government if this suddenly becomes a major tourist destination, as has happened in other parts of Belize,” adds Mes.

Belize’s Ministry of Tourism is planning a large-scale expansion of transport infrastructure in the region, hoping to attract more tourists to Toledo, the southern district bordering Guatemala.

Currently, many major US cities are connected to the country, but there are no European flights.

“We believe we can continue to build the tourism industry [in Toledo] if we build airports and air links in the country,” says Anthony Mahler, Belize’s Minister of Tourism. “[We also need] to invest in infrastructure that supports tourism, such as hotel rooms, roads to archaeological sites and national parks.”

There are numerous archaeological sites throughout the country, including in the Toledo region and around Santa Cruz, which are a key attraction for foreign visitors.

“Obviously you need to focus on the sustainability of our cultures, our natural resources and training our employees to ensure they are ready to work in the tourism industry at a high level,” adds Mahler. “We are updating our Sustainable Tourism Master Plan, which guides what we are doing to address today’s issues.”

The corn dough is wrapped in a large foil to keep it fresh.

The corn dough is wrapped in a large foil to keep it fresh.

Courtesy of Lucy Sherriff

“I am a bit worried”

Bruno Kuppinger, who works with Mes, has carefully developed relationships with Mayan communities.

“I don’t think anything will realistically happen in the next five to 10 years,” Kuppinger said. “But Mayan villages definitely need some kind of protection.

“I’m a bit concerned that Toledo will be the next emerging destination, and there won’t be any safeguards in place to prevent anyone from visiting the villages.”

Mahler is adamant that the government will work closely with communities to consult with them on any expansion and that the country’s extensive tourist guide training program will ensure that mass tourism to Mayan villages remains contained.

“We believe we have enough quality guides to conduct tours in these [Maya] communities,” adds Mahler. “And the infrastructure that hundreds or thousands of people would need to get to that area just doesn’t exist. So by the nature of the lack of infrastructure, you’re not going to see that level of tourist activity in these communities like Santa Cruz.”

Involving visitors in the Mayan way of life helps preserve their own traditions, but it’s a delicate balance against the threat of overtourism. It’s a story that takes place all over the world.

“We are moving more into the modern world because our way of life is so hard to maintain in the times we live in,” says Mes. “But we would like to be able to manage our involvement in the outside world and not have strangers come to us without our permission.”

However, if handled with care and sensitivity, tourism activity could provide a sustainable future for Santa Cruz.

Mes relishes the opportunity to share his traditions and indigenous knowledge with outsiders – and also learns from tourists himself. “I’m not against people visiting our village, I appreciate the conversations and the connections.

“It’s a good opportunity to learn about our way of life, and maybe they can take something with them. And of course, we also learn from tourists.”

Top image: Bird’s eye view of the jungle in Belize’s Toledo District. (Courtesy of Lucy Sherriff)

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The Other Americans: Residents Leave One of Guatemala’s Top Tourist Destinations https://ipmsguatemala.org/the-other-americans-residents-leave-one-of-guatemalas-top-tourist-destinations/ Tue, 30 Aug 2022 18:51:38 +0000 https://ipmsguatemala.org/the-other-americans-residents-leave-one-of-guatemalas-top-tourist-destinations/ The peaceful Tz’utujil Mayan town of Santiago Atitlán has long been a tourist destination, even during the darkest days of Guatemala’s thirty-six years of internal armed conflict. Tourists are drawn to the picturesque Lake Atitlán and the town’s indigenous traditions. But in recent years it has been marred by a pandemic and, despite a reported […]]]>

The peaceful Tz’utujil Mayan town of Santiago Atitlán has long been a tourist destination, even during the darkest days of Guatemala’s thirty-six years of internal armed conflict. Tourists are drawn to the picturesque Lake Atitlán and the town’s indigenous traditions. But in recent years it has been marred by a pandemic and, despite a reported return to normal, migration is on the rise.

“We have about three people who have gone to the United States,” said Juan Manuel Ramierez, a local evangelical preacher. The progressive in an interview in April 2022.

He points out that migration from this city to the United States was rare fifteen years ago. Now, he says, it has become routine.

“In times of [internal armed] conflict, there are only a few people left,” adds Ramierez. “But the pandemic has come to affect the economy, so there are people choosing to go to the United States.”

Diego Sapol, a local academic researcher, explains that community migration has increased over the past two years. “There are a lot of people looking for a way to get that money to go to the United States to find an opportunity,” Sapol said. The progressive.

“The lack of employment has greatly affected [of people],” he says. “Some families sometimes don’t even have enough for their children’s education, food, or health care. So they cross the United States and give their children a decent life.

The current cost of a coyote, or migrant guide, from Santiago Atitlán is currently around 125,000 quetzales, or more than $16,000. Sapol himself has been approached to migrate, but he has no interest at the moment.

“I thought about going several times,” says Sapol. “Many times I thought it best to go [to the United States] look for an opportunity. »

Due to inflation, the cost of living has increased in Guatemala. But as costs rise, daily wages have hovered around fifty or sixty quetzales a day (between $6.50 and $7.75).


A similar phenomenon occurs a short boat ride away in the municipality of San Pedro la Laguna, also a Mayan community. Since the start of the pandemic, residents of San Pedro have sought to reach the United States to find opportunity.

The city is located on the western shore of Lake Atitlán. It is popular with tourists from the alternative spiritual movement and retired Israel Defense Forces soldiers. But this never contributed to the development of the local economy, and worse, the presence of tourists drove many local residents out of their markets.

“Tourism only benefits certain groups,” says Sapol. “Mainly people who own spaces by the lake.


The tourism industry in these towns with largely Aboriginal full-time residents has done little to develop the community. Opportunities for young people, for example, remain limited. This situation is particularly dire for residents who have a higher level of education, as there are few job opportunities.

At least three of the victims of the San Antonio, Texas tragedy in June 2022, where fifty-three migrants died in a trailer, were from villages in the Atitlán Basin.

“Many times I thought it best to leave [to the United States] look for an opportunity.

The region has also seen the concentration of land in the hands of foreigners seeking to profit from tourism. Yet despite this, the Guatemalan government continues to promote tourism as a means of economic development.

“The model, the style of economic growth, is completely exhausted,” said Jonathan Menkos, director of the Central American Institute for Fiscal Studies. The progressive. “And no amount of tourism or foreign direct investment flows can compensate for this style of economic growth that does not generate enough jobs or conditions to sustain people.”


One of the few opportunities in the region is to meet the demand for drugs from tourists. The presence of drug and narco culture in the community has contributed to the city being classified as a red zone for US Peace Corps volunteers, according to US program participants.

“There are many children, there are young women and there are mothers [and] older men who are [selling drugs] because of the lack of jobs,” says Sapol. “The same [economic] necessity compels them to do things that are crimes.

Faced with this image as a destination for drugs, the Guatemalan ministries of foreign affairs and tourism have launched a international campaign entitled “Enjoy a drug-free Guatemala”. But the lack of surveillance and regulation around the lake has created a destination where impunity reigns.

“What hope is there in the country when there is a gang of thieves in power [the country]?” Juan José Hurtado, the director of the association for the defense of migrants Pop No’j, says The progressive. “When what [these thieves] do is to persecute people who try to do the right thing; when what you see is prices going up and the basic cost of living going up, and people going through hardship to survive.

Added to this are the violence and extortion caused by the economic crisis. increasing. This means that opening small businesses for many is almost impossible to obtain.

“[This] is a country that offers no future to anyone,” says Hurtado. “There is no hope in Guatemala and desperation is a problem that forces people to leave.”

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