Guatemala tourism – IPMS Guatemala http://ipmsguatemala.org/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 06:39:28 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://ipmsguatemala.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-61-120x120.png Guatemala tourism – IPMS Guatemala http://ipmsguatemala.org/ 32 32 Central America aims to reactivate tourism sector and create jobs with IDB investment – English version https://ipmsguatemala.org/central-america-aims-to-reactivate-tourism-sector-and-create-jobs-with-idb-investment-english-version/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 16:59:37 +0000 https://ipmsguatemala.org/central-america-aims-to-reactivate-tourism-sector-and-create-jobs-with-idb-investment-english-version/ The Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) and the Central American Federation of Chambers of Tourism (Fedecatur) have launched a plan, dubbed A Tool for the Reactivation of Tourism in Central America (Reactur), which aims to benefit 4,000 micro and small businesses in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Costa Rica and stimulate job creation. The plan will […]]]>

The Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) and the Central American Federation of Chambers of Tourism (Fedecatur) have launched a plan, dubbed A Tool for the Reactivation of Tourism in Central America (Reactur), which aims to benefit 4,000 micro and small businesses in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Costa Rica and stimulate job creation.

The plan will be funded by a non-repayable investment of $1.6 million.

The Reactur project will develop business innovation and technological and digital transformation programs, as well as the training, promotion, marketing and improvement of environmental management programs in the four countries.

The objective of the plan is to accelerate the reactivation process and create opportunities for income generation and employment for micro, small and medium-sized enterprises in the tourism sector, and hopes to reactivate 10,000 jobs, with particular emphasis on the inclusion of women and young people. , which have the highest unemployment and poverty rates regionally and nationally.

The funds will come from a $575,000 non-reimbursable technical cooperation grant from the IDB Lab and a $1 million matching contribution from Fedecatur. The plan will be implemented over a three-year period.

Competitiveness and resilience

Rolando Schweikert, president of the Chamber of Tourism of Guatemala (CAMTUR), and who holds the presidency pro tempore of Fedecatur, said: “with this project, the regional private tourism sector will benefit from the efforts to make tourism a competitive industry. and resilient. , according to the priorities and objectives of the regional tourism policy that will be launched in the coming months by the ministers of tourism of the eight countries of the region”.

In addition, he pointed out that this project “will forge alliances with several regional integration bodies, as well as with others at the national level specialized in the different areas that integrate the components of the Reactur project”.

The pillars of the Reactor plan

The project consists of several components that aim to strengthen the commercial fabric of the Central American region, by creating jobs, promoting talent and innovation, providing training in service and sales, of the technological and digital transformation of companies, strengthening environmental management and the consolidation of “smart” tourist destinations.

Estrella Peinado-Vara, IDB, said the IDB Group’s Innovation Lab seeks to support projects that enable micro and small businesses to offer more competitive tourism products.

“We support the use of new technologies and innovation so that the tourism sector continues to be a source of employment while promoting environmental conservation,” she said.

Multi-destination marketing

Carlos Umaña, President of the Salvadoran Chamber of Tourism, says the project aims to generate a technological toolbox as well as innovation to strengthen the human talent of small and medium-sized businesses, as well as to improve the customer service experience. through customer service certification. program.

These two actions, together with the improvement of digital marketing management, will allow micro and small businesses in the four countries, which for years have been part of the tourism value chain, to become benchmarks and development destinations in offer to the world and thus to energize the economy.

Above all, in “the new normal, the current conditions are increasingly competitive and we find a more demanding tourist, which challenges us to seek excellence in the tourism sector”, he said.

For his part, the Vice President of the National Chamber of Tourism of Honduras, Andrés Ehrler, added that “all tourist destinations in Central America are more than ready to work together in multi-destination marketing strategies that generate a positive impact on tourists, as well as strengthening businesses with certifications that promote sustainability, innovation and good customer service”.

“Smart” destinations

And for his part, the president of the National Chamber of Tourism of Costa Rica, Rubén Acón, said that the project aims to bring together tourism companies, national chambers of tourism and authorities with the concept of “smart” tourist destinations, a model that seeks to consolidate innovative destinations that offer greater technological infrastructure that is sustainable and accessible to all, increasing the quality of the tourist experience and improving the quality of life of residents.

In addition, he said that climate change mitigation and adaptation measures should be considered, given that Central America is one of the regions most vulnerable to its effects. (https://www.bloomberglinea.com/english/central-america-aims-to-reactivate-tourism-sector-create-jobs-with-ibd-investment/)

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GW to Lead in Promoting Indigenous Tourism and Economic Development | Today https://ipmsguatemala.org/gw-to-lead-in-promoting-indigenous-tourism-and-economic-development-today/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 14:55:35 +0000 https://ipmsguatemala.org/gw-to-lead-in-promoting-indigenous-tourism-and-economic-development-today/ By Nick Erickson Since joining George Washington University in 2016, director of the International Institute for Tourism Studies and Adjunct Professor at GW School of Business Seleni Matus helped the university become a leader in promoting the voices, histories, and cultures of Indigenous peoples through tourism by forming key partnerships and advocating for national support […]]]>

By Nick Erickson

Since joining George Washington University in 2016, director of the International Institute for Tourism Studies and Adjunct Professor at GW School of Business Seleni Matus helped the university become a leader in promoting the voices, histories, and cultures of Indigenous peoples through tourism by forming key partnerships and advocating for national support from the U.S. government.

Some of the Institute’s work includes prime tourism alliances in North and South Dakota. In October 2020, the Institute hosted an Indigenous Tourism Forum which discussed the impact of COVID-19 on Indigenous communities and led to the creation of the Indigenous Tourism Collaborative of the Americas.

Ahead of National Native American Heritage Month, GW Today spoke with Matus about some of the institute’s work and how the GW community connects with Indigenous communities through tourism. Here is an excerpt from that conversation.

Q: What role has GW played in enhancing Aboriginal tourism efforts?

A: Indigenous peoples are largely invisible in our society, and you find that even involvement in research and technical assistance with these groups is not very common. GW has worked with Indigenous communities for over a decade. The work GW has done with Indigenous communities somewhat predates me. When I arrived at the Institute in 2016, there was already groundwork laid and basic partnerships established. What we’ve done is really catalyze aboriginal tourism initiatives. Our approach was extremely practical. When the Native American Tourism and Visitor Experience Enhancement Act (NATIVE)– one of the last pieces of legislation signed by President Obama before leaving office – was being drafted by Senator Brian Schatz of Hawaii, the Bureau of Indian Affairs really leaned on us to provide some insight into what it would take to support capacity building nationally to support Indigenous tourism. They used the lessons learned from our project work and incorporated them into their legislative recommendations.

GW’s work which helped shape some of the key elements of the NATIVE Act has also been used by the Bureau of Indian Affairs to leverage congressional resources to fund tourism projects. We have always worked with the Bureau of Indian Affairs, and more recently with the Indian Economic Development Bureauboth part of the Ministry of the Interior.

Professor GW Seleni Matus, right, leads a team of students during a tourism asset mapping activity in October 2019 at the South Dakota Tribal Tourism Forum. (Courtesy of Seleni Matus)


Q: What is the working structure of the Institute with respect to Indigenous tourism efforts?

A: We work in support of tribal nations to develop indigenous tourism. Since the vast majority of Tribal Nations are in rural areas and smaller communities, we have encouraged Tribal Nations to unite and work together regionally. We have helped support the development of regional tourism alliances. GW helps them build alliances, and then those alliances can form nonprofits, raise their own funds, and start operating on their own. In the first project in North Dakota, the alliance is an ad hoc network developing partnerships and tours in the travel industry and they are now self-sustaining, which is great. Thus, North Dakota is an example of this progression from dependence on us to self-sufficiency.

Q: To what extent are GW students involved in these projects?

A: The Institute employs GW Tourism graduate students early on. All of the students working on these projects in North Dakota, South Dakota and now Maine are from the Master of Science in Tourism, Hospitality and Event Management program. We employ about five or six of them at a time, and they have unique opportunities to help with research, help with project management, help with capacity building and also with field work.


Use this interactive map to learn more about the original stewards of the lands in the United States and around the world.


Q: What is the relationship between the Aboriginal community and state or federal governments?

A: Tourism development and marketing in the United States occurs primarily at the state tourism level and it is important to note that state tourism efforts have rarely benefited Indigenous communities. Take South Dakota, for example. Tourism is one of the most formidable industries in the state, but tribal nations were until recently completely excluded from the benefits that flow from it. What we’ve done is not only try to support or foster greater unity among tribes to address these common challenges, but we’ve also helped build bridges where they didn’t exist, creating partnerships between tribal nations and states. Of course, in most of these places the relationship between tribal nations and the state, such as South and North Dakota, is historically tumultuous. But the unique thing about our work is that we’ve been able to bring together parties that don’t ordinarily speak to each other, to really find commonalities, and then work together to find solutions to these challenges in developing tourism in nations. tribal. In the case of the State of South Dakota, the cooperation led by State Tourism and other departments in the creation of the South Dakota Tribal Tourism Alliance and its support for tribal tourism development planning facilitated by GW have been remarkable.

Q: How can the GW community connect with Indigenous communities through tourism, and how can people amplify those voices and stories?

A: It is important to recognize that Indigenous peoples were the original stewards of the land on which GW sits. GW stands on the ancestral lands of Piscataway and Nacotchtank. There is also a Student Union group that represents Native Americans at GW, and it’s a wonderful way to engage with the existing Native American community on campus. In terms of supporting aboriginal tourism, I think it’s important that wherever our American students are from, whatever state they are in, they learn about the tribal nations in their state and seek to find out what these indigenous communities have to offer.

The best thing you can do is be a visitor in your own backyard to know your place. Respect starts with understanding the nearby Indigenous communities and making real connections with them through tourism, which is a wonderful way to learn about tribal nations. You leave your money in these places, and it will help support families and contribute to the continued economic development of these communities.


Friday November 11

2 p.m.

Aboriginal Veterans Procession and Dedication

The Indigenous Veterans Dedication Procession and Ceremony will take place beginning at 2 p.m. on the National Mall as part of a three-day celebration that includes hands-on activities, films, performances and a hospitality suite for veterans. The procession and dedication will be broadcast live.

November 18 to 25

2022 Indigenous Film Showcase (Virtual)

This is an annual celebration of the best Aboriginal films. Embracing the oral histories, knowledge and ancestral lands of their communities, Indigenous filmmakers seek guidance from the past and envision new paths for the future. The showcase provides a unique forum for engagement with filmmakers from Indigenous communities in the Western Hemisphere and the Arctic.

The online program includes a total of 35 films (six feature films and 30 short films) representing 30 indigenous nations in eight different countries: United States, Canada, New Zealand, Mexico, Guatemala, Ecuador, Colombia and Sweden. There are 10 native languages ​​spoken in the movies. Genres include documentaries, music videos, kid-friendly shorts, native language films and more.

Saturday November 19

2 p.m.

Film screening
Imagining the Indian: The Fight Against the Native American Mascot

imagine the indian is a comprehensive review of movement to eradicate demeaning and offensive words, images and gestures from the world of sport. The film dives deep into the issues through archival footage and interviews with those involved in the fight. The psychological research is clear: the use of Native American mascots is detrimental, not only to Native Americans, but to marginalized groups everywhere.

A conversation with Suzan Harjo (Cheyenne/Hodulgee Muscogee), Presidential Medal of Freedom recipient and Indigenous rights advocate, director of the National Museum of the American Indian; Cynthia Chavez Lamar (San Felipe Pueblo/Hopi/Tewa/Navajo); Smithsonian Undersecretary for Museums and Culture Kevin Gover (Pawnee); and founding director of the National Museum of the American Indian W. Richard West Jr. (Southern Cheyenne) will follow the screening.

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Mérida Mayor Renan Barrera Bolsters Industrial, Tourism Ties With Guatemala – The Yucatan Times https://ipmsguatemala.org/merida-mayor-renan-barrera-bolsters-industrial-tourism-ties-with-guatemala-the-yucatan-times/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 00:00:41 +0000 https://ipmsguatemala.org/merida-mayor-renan-barrera-bolsters-industrial-tourism-ties-with-guatemala-the-yucatan-times/ Mayor Renán Barrera Concha met with Guatemalan and Yucatec businessmen and industrialists to increase investment opportunities and promote tourism in the city, with the aim of creating business strategies that generate greater economic development, increase employment opportunities and stimulate the city’s service sector. During the meeting held at the International Congress Center (CIC), the Mayor […]]]>

Mayor Renán Barrera Concha met with Guatemalan and Yucatec businessmen and industrialists to increase investment opportunities and promote tourism in the city, with the aim of creating business strategies that generate greater economic development, increase employment opportunities and stimulate the city’s service sector.

During the meeting held at the International Congress Center (CIC), the Mayor met with José Centeno Reyes, National President of the National Chamber of the Processing Industry (CANACINTRA), Jorge Charruf Cáceres, President of the CANACINTRA Yucatán Delegation and a delegation of Guatemalan businessmen. present the infrastructure options, security and services of the city, as well as the program of cultural and tourist activities that Mérida offers as an attractive destination for visitors from Central America.

Accompanied by José Luis Martínez Semerena, Director of Economic Development and Tourism, Barrera Concha informed that during the meeting, the progress of the city in terms of infrastructure for industry and commerce, the different congress centers, the educational opportunities and tourist attractions in the city were presented. .

“Mérida continues to consolidate itself as a tourist destination for national and international visitors, however, another important aspect is its attractiveness as an investment hub, due to the indices of security, social peace, infrastructure, trade relations and the quality of public services. , which guarantee the prosperity of companies that decide to settle in the city,” he said.

The state government of Yucatan and the city of Mérida, he added, are working to modernize and create an infrastructure that promotes the development of the local economy, as is the case of the gastronomic tourist corridor on 60th street, and also encourages new industries to decide to invest in our city.

He also pointed out that representatives of TAG Airlines attended the meeting to explore new routes connecting Mérida to Guatemala, due to the interest that this new connection has generated.

For his part, Martinez Semerena explained that the Guatemalan delegation was made up of 16 businessmen from different sectors, interested in investing in the city, which is why they contacted the Investment Attraction Office to establish mechanisms for exploration of the environment, with studies of the markets and the areas available to present a range of options on the areas where they can settle or invest and the distribution chains of materials and suppliers.

“During the work meeting, these businessmen from Guatemala were linked to our management to coordinate efforts to attract investment, supporting them with on-site studies so that they could know the types of markets, distribution channels, commercial circuits and the interconnection of Mérida with the country and the rest of the world,” he said.

He indicated that one of the topics discussed in the working meeting was to take advantage of the existing infrastructure for the development of events, so that the congresses that will be held have the possibility of being held in Mérida, because, in plus facilities, there is a large hotel, gastronomic and service capacity.

Likewise, the congresses will have the possibility of creating alternative programs that allow visitors to know the tourist attractions, archaeological sites, cultural offers and artistic activities that exist every day in the historic center of the city and the traditional neighborhoods.

Finally, the delegation from Guatemala was made up of industrialists and entrepreneurs Alma Coronado, Alejandro González, Francisco Valladares, Rolando Tarot, Carlos Torres, Luis Alfonso Bosch Chinchilla, Selvin Emanuel Palacios Rodríguez, Andrés Rivera, Ileana Nájera Urruela, Elvin Tobar, Andrea María Romero López, Kimberly Hernández and Walter Daniel Emilio Bran Coronado.

The Yucatan era
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Yucatan Ministry of Tourism Promotion Presents “Yucatan Sabores Festival” – The Yucatan Times https://ipmsguatemala.org/yucatan-ministry-of-tourism-promotion-presents-yucatan-sabores-festival-the-yucatan-times/ Sun, 23 Oct 2022 14:20:58 +0000 https://ipmsguatemala.org/yucatan-ministry-of-tourism-promotion-presents-yucatan-sabores-festival-the-yucatan-times/ As part of the celebration of the 50 Best Restaurants Latin America 2022 awards, which will be held from November 11 to 15, the city of Mérida will also host the ‘Sabores de Yucatán’ Festival, from November 11 to 13, with the aim of positioning the Yucatec gastronomy in the world and makes it another […]]]>

As part of the celebration of the 50 Best Restaurants Latin America 2022 awards, which will be held from November 11 to 15, the city of Mérida will also host the ‘Sabores de Yucatán’ Festival, from November 11 to 13, with the aim of positioning the Yucatec gastronomy in the world and makes it another attraction of the region’s tourist offer.

To present the event, the tourist institution of Yucatan brought together some of the protagonists of the fair, such as the Secretary of Tourism of the State of Yucatan, Michelle Fridman Hirsch, Claudia González Góngora, recently appointed President of the National Chamber of restaurant and seasoned Food Industry, and Carlos Guillermo Aguirre Aguilar, President of the Association of Restaurants and Gastronomic Services of Valladolid (Mexico), Carlos Guillermo Aguirre Aguilar, President of the Association of Restaurants and Gastronomic Services of Valladolid (Mexico) , as well as some of the best chefs in Yucatan, such as Roberto Solís, one of the main exponents of the new Yucatan cuisine, Wilson Alonzo, chef and researcher of traditional Yucatan cuisine, Luis Ronzón, chef of the restaurant of the Hotel Chablé. All agreed on the importance of the two events for the region and the good times that the gastronomy of Yucatan is experiencing.

Michelle Fridman Hirsch, Secretary of Tourism for the State of Yucatán, explained the details of the “Sabores de Yucatán” festival and all the activities that will take place around it. The event, which will showcase the region’s deep-rooted culinary heritage and showcase the interplay between ancient Yucatan culinary traditions and new contemporary trends, will feature food tastings, food talks, tastings, pairings , tours, competitions and master classes. by some of the world’s most famous chefs.

Among the activities that will be held within the framework of the “Festival de Sabores de Yucatán”, the secretariat highlighted the market with Yucatan products, such as Yucatan honey, chocolate, sauces, and a long etcetera, the stations with Yucatan chefs and emblematic products, the Bier Garden or two important gastronomic circuits through different restaurants.

Regarding the impact of the festival, Fridman Hirsch pointed out that “gastronomic tourism is a transversal sector” and, moreover, that “the Yucatan region has one of the richest and most diversified gastronomy in the world”. The celebration of the awards gala for the 50 best restaurants in Latin America 2022 makes this week of November the ideal month to organize the first “Festival de Sabores de Yucatán”. Among the reasons for holding this event is also “the economic impact it will generate in the whole sector, and that it contributes to “bringing benefits to farmers, fishermen, …”

Festival gastronómico de Mérida, courtesy of National Geographic en Español.

The Yucatan region has experienced a significant economic recovery after the pandemic and, while in 2019 “records were broken in all areas, in 2022 we are already above these figures in indicators such as the arrival of tourists with overnight stays or air flows”, he added.

After the intervention of the Secretary of Tourism of Yucatán, Claudia González Góngora, President of the National Chamber of the Restaurant and Seasonal Food Industry, took over and pointed out that “over the years, the Yucatán has positioned itself as a place known for its gastronomy”. He also pointed out that the region “has a lot of culinary talent”, in addition to agreeing with Michelle Fridman Hirsch in highlighting the significant economic impact that these events will generate in Yucatán.

Carlos Guillermo Aguirre Aguilar, president of the Association of Restaurants and Gastronomic Services of Mérida, said in his speech that “we must continue to promote gastronomy because it is not only the product but the experience that gives it the added value”.

Several of the best chefs from the Yucatan food scene also had the opportunity to speak during the presentation. For example, Wilson Alonzo, a researcher on traditional Yucatan cuisine, pointed out that “this opportunity to have the festival means a great economic impact for our community”, and he wanted to defend the products, techniques and flavors of the cuisine. from Yucatan.

Chef Roberto Solís, the main exponent of new Yucatan cuisine, explained that “we are always looking to promote this industry and it is essential to show the faces of the people who make this type of experience possible. We want the people of Yucatán to feel loved and supported.

Luis Ronzón, the restaurant chef at Hotel Chablé, concluded the presentation by explaining that “those of us who are in charge of the kitchens are the protagonists, but as chefs we feel responsible for passing on the products and traditions of Yucatec culture.

In the round of questions, the Secretary of Tourism of the State of Yucatan, Michelle Fridman Hirsch confirmed that renowned chefs such as Dabiz Muñoz or Jordi Roca, in addition to many national and local chefs, will be present at this first edition of the “Yucatan Sabores Festival”.

With this event, the Ministry of Tourism of Yucatan aims not only to claim the gastronomic treasures of the region, but to complement them with all the tourist offers that Yucatan has to offer. Characterized by its natural wonders, such as the famous cenotes and its beaches of white sand and turquoise water, as well as by its unparalleled cultural heritage, with archaeological sites of global importance such as Chichén Itzá and Uxmal, a cultural mosaic where the living culture of the Maya stands out. Not in vain, the capital of Yucatan, Mérida, is the only city in the world to be recognized twice as the American capital of culture, in addition to being the only Mexican city in the Top 10 of the best cities in the world by Condé Nast Traveler in 2021, in the category of large cities. In this same year 2022, Merida was recognized in fourth position in the same category.

Festival gastronómico de Mérida, courtesy of National Geographic en Español.

In addition, the good connectivity with the region is another reason to visit Yucatan, since it is directly connected to some of the main airports in the country such as Mexico City, AIFA, Guadalajara, Monterrey, Toluca, Tuxtla Gutierrez, Veracruz, Villahermosa, Tijuana . , and Oaxaca, as well as international connections with the cities of Miami, Houston, Oakland, Dallas, Toronto, Havana, Flores and Guatemala.

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Storm Roslyn expected to develop into a hurricane near Mexican tourist sites https://ipmsguatemala.org/storm-roslyn-expected-to-develop-into-a-hurricane-near-mexican-tourist-sites/ Fri, 21 Oct 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://ipmsguatemala.org/storm-roslyn-expected-to-develop-into-a-hurricane-near-mexican-tourist-sites/ Updates with the latest information MEXICO CITY, October 20 (Reuters) – Tropical Storm Roslyn is expected to develop into a hurricane on Friday evening, the US National Hurricane Center (NHC) said, as it moves up central Mexico towards tourist resorts on its Pacific coast. Hurricane conditions could batter the coast between San Blas in Mexico’s […]]]>

Updates with the latest information

MEXICO CITY, October 20 (Reuters)Tropical Storm Roslyn is expected to develop into a hurricane on Friday evening, the US National Hurricane Center (NHC) said, as it moves up central Mexico towards tourist resorts on its Pacific coast.

Hurricane conditions could batter the coast between San Blas in Mexico’s Riviera Nayarit to Perula Beach in Jalisco state, home to the resort town of Puerto Vallarta, the Mexico-based meteorologist said on Thursday. Miami.

Jalisco’s government said tourism to the coast and mountainous areas had been banned over the weekend, and it asked people to avoid going to the beaches. He said 300 civil protection officers were on standby.

The NHC said tropical storm conditions could hit the coast from Perula to Manzanilla, a port city in Colima state.

NHC forecasts show Roslyn picking up speed to reach 100 miles per hour (160 km/h) Saturday night in the ocean off Puerto Vallarta.

This would make Roslyn a Category 2 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson scale. It is expected to dissipate when it hits land.

At 10 p.m. (0300 GMT), Roslyn was some 230 miles (375 km) south-southeast of Manzanillo, with maximum sustained winds of 50 mph (85 km/h), the NHC said.

He said the storm could bring high winds and dangerous storm surge, while heavy rain could cause flash flooding and landslides.

The storm could also bring 1 to 3 inches (3 to 8 cm) of rain along coastal parts of Guerrero and Michoacan states, and up to six inches along the Colima and Jalisco coast, it said. -he declares.

The NHC expects Roslyn to also bring heavy rain to Nayarit, the Islas Marias archipelago and parts of southern Sinaloa.

(Reporting by Sarah Morland; Editing by Sandra Maler)

((sarah.morland@thomsonreuters.com;))

The views and opinions expressed herein are the views and opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Nasdaq, Inc.

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Japan’s Nikkei ends lower even as tourism stocks shine https://ipmsguatemala.org/japans-nikkei-ends-lower-even-as-tourism-stocks-shine/ Mon, 17 Oct 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://ipmsguatemala.org/japans-nikkei-ends-lower-even-as-tourism-stocks-shine/ By Sam Byford TOKYO, October 17 (Reuters) – Japanese stocks fell on Monday, following Wall Street’s fall from the previous session as investors braced for more signals of a global recession, although tourism-related stocks performed well after borders reopened in the week. last. Japan’s Nikkei stock average dipped well below the key psychological barrier of […]]]>

By Sam Byford

TOKYO, October 17 (Reuters)Japanese stocks fell on Monday, following Wall Street’s fall from the previous session as investors braced for more signals of a global recession, although tourism-related stocks performed well after borders reopened in the week. last.

Japan’s Nikkei stock average dipped well below the key psychological barrier of 27,000 at the open and closed down 1.16% at 26,775.79. The index stabilized in the afternoon, supported by positive US stock futures.

The broader Topix index .TOPX fell 0.98%.

The Nikkei posted its biggest percentage gain since March on Friday. “We expect the market to be softer today in reaction to this,” Nomura Securities strategist Maki Sawada said in a briefing with reporters, adding that data on U.S. consumer sentiment Friday pushes stock prices down again.

High-growth stocks detracted the most from the index, with online medical services company M3 Inc 2413.T down 3.9%, Fast Retailing Co Ltd down 1.28% and SoftBank Group Corp 9984.T lose 1.79%.

Department stores were among the best performers in the Nikkei. Shares of Isetan Mitsukoshi Holdings Ltd 3099.T jumped 4.48%, Takashimaya Co Ltd 8233.T increased by 3.16%, and J.Front Retailing Co Ltd 3086.T gained 2.14%.

“We believe the expectation for a recovery in inbound demand continues,” Nomura’s Sawada said. “On TV news this weekend, you could see images of foreigners with suitcases buying in bulk, partly because of the weak yen.”

Japan last week restored visa-free travel to dozens of countries, ending some of the world’s strictest border controls to slow the spread of COVID-19. Prime Minister Fumio Kishida is counting on tourism to help reinvigorate the economy and capitalize on the yen’s plunge to its lowest level in decades.

Shipping Company Kawasaki Kisen Kaisha Ltd 9107.T, which also operates a travel agency, gained the most on the Nikkei with a rise of 6.61%. Par shares Mitsui OSK Lines Ltd 9104.T increased by 3.76%.

Rail and airline companies have also increased. Air Transport .IAIRL.TLand transportation .IRAIL.T and sea transport .ISHIP.T were the only three sectors to progress on the overall Topix index.

Fujifilm Holdings Corp. 4901.T fell by 0.56% following the announcement he would stop working on Avigan as a treatment for COVID-19. Japan had ordered the company to triple its stockpile of flu drugs at the start of the pandemic.

Of the 225 Nikkei voters, 37 won, 183 fell and five traded flat.

(Reporting by Sam Byford; Editing by Sherry Jacob-Phillips)

((Sam.Byford@thomsonreuters.com;))

The views and opinions expressed herein are the views and opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Nasdaq, Inc.

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Ascend Remote Workers Help Elevate State Tourism | VM News https://ipmsguatemala.org/ascend-remote-workers-help-elevate-state-tourism-vm-news/ Sun, 16 Oct 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://ipmsguatemala.org/ascend-remote-workers-help-elevate-state-tourism-vm-news/ Country the United States of AmericaUS Virgin IslandsU.S. Minor Outlying IslandsCanadaMexico, United Mexican StatesBahamas, Commonwealth ofCuba, Republic ofDominican RepublicHaiti, Republic ofJamaicaAfghanistanAlbania, People’s Socialist Republic ofAlgeria, People’s Democratic Republic ofAmerican SamoaAndorra, Principality ofAngola, Republic ofAnguillaAntarctica (the territory south of 60 degrees S)Antigua and BarbudaArgentina, Argentine RepublicArmeniaArubaAustralia, Commonwealth ofAustria, Republic ofAzerbaijan, Republic ofBahrain, Kingdom ofBangladesh, People’s Republic […]]]>

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Costa Rica Social Tourism Project: https://ipmsguatemala.org/costa-rica-social-tourism-project/ Sun, 16 Oct 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://ipmsguatemala.org/costa-rica-social-tourism-project/ In Costa Rica, social tourism is established as a universal right that guarantees access to rest, leisure, leisure and free time for socially and economically vulnerable segments of the population. Therefore, in 2018, the Costa Rican Tourism Institute created the “Social Tourism with Integrity Program”. It intends to encourage citizen participation in social and accessible […]]]>

In Costa Rica, social tourism is established as a universal right that guarantees access to rest, leisure, leisure and free time for socially and economically vulnerable segments of the population.

Therefore, in 2018, the Costa Rican Tourism Institute created the “Social Tourism with Integrity Program”. It intends to encourage citizen participation in social and accessible tourism through the involvement and strengthening of alliances between the living forces of the communities.

The program has enabled many vulnerable populations to experience tourism through national projects and public and private activities.

Currently, it has 36 tourism companies, foundations, NGOs and public organizations, which develop programs, projects and activities to improve the quality of life of citizens, validating the right of every human being to leisure and recreation through tourism according to the principles of inclusion and accessibility.

For example, Mangrove Hotel, Monteverde Cloud Forest Biological Reserve, Tabacón Hotel, FuncaTV, Unique Adventures, UNED: School of Social Sciences and Humanities, Occidental Tamarindo Hotel, Polo Turístico Papagayo, Arenal Adventure World, Costa Rica Adapted Surfing Association, Hotel Villa Lapas , Rosa Blanca Farm, Fiesta Resort Hotel, Il Viaggio Travel and Cala Lodge are all involved.

“Social tourism is a way to provide vulnerable populations with opportunities to enjoy tourism, recreation and recreation. Social tourism opens the doors to everyone to enjoy our country.

For us it is important to be part of the program to make our work visible and reach more and more people,” said Natalia Vindas, Adapted Surfing Sports Association for the inclusive development of surfing for people with disabilities.

The program involved projects from companies and organizations located in the seven provinces of Costa Rica, benefiting children, youth, the elderly, people with disabilities, low-income families, cancer survivors and indigenous populations.

In addition, the project is based on three pillars: inclusion, solidarity and accessibility. The population that benefited from this initiative has very different social, economic, physical and psychological conditions. These people have different needs but the same right of access to leisure.

The alliances generated within the various programs and institutions promote a spirit of collaboration and integration of the communities. This allows the socially vulnerable population to enjoy a recreational experience and to feel included.

People with Disabilities are also included in the program, as the provision of optimal services is encouraged. For example, accessibility is promoted in services, products, signage and communication. The idea is that no one is left behind.

Although there are still many areas for improvement and much work to do, Costa Rica is well on its way to consolidating a tourism model that embraces everyone and has a positive impact on society.

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Curaçao dive tourism operators become members of Green Fins https://ipmsguatemala.org/curacao-dive-tourism-operators-become-members-of-green-fins/ Fri, 14 Oct 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://ipmsguatemala.org/curacao-dive-tourism-operators-become-members-of-green-fins/ The Reef World Foundation launched a new online platform, the Green Fin Hubwhich will help from Curacao leaders in sustainable dive tourism Green Fins Digital Members in the development of best environmental practices for maritime tourism. These leading sustainable dive tourism operators (Ocean Encounters, The dive bus, Scubacao and GO WEST Diving) in Curacao have […]]]>

The Reef World Foundation launched a new online platform, the Green Fin Hubwhich will help from Curacao leaders in sustainable dive tourism Green Fins Digital Members in the development of best environmental practices for maritime tourism.

These leading sustainable dive tourism operators (Ocean Encounters, The dive bus, Scubacao and GO WEST Diving) in Curacao have all become Green Fins Digital Members reinforce the need to create change in order to provide future generations with the opportunity for a healthy and sustainable environment, both above and below the waterline.

According Bryan Hornefounder of Diving Curacao:

“From a private sector perspective, Dive Curacao is incredibly proud to support sustainable dive tourism and these leaders in Curacao’s dive tourism industry to create change. After all, if we do nothing to support the environment, we will end up having an unsustainable dive tourism industry in Curacao. This will lead to an inability to deliver exceptional travel and dive vacation experiences in the future. The bottom line is that apathy cannot no longer be accepted.

Whereas JJ Harveydirector at Reef World Foundationsaid:

“Maritime tourism plays an important role in Curaçao’s economy and as the industry develops, it is essential to establish practical approaches to protect the marine environment. By adopting Green Fins, dive operators are taking critical steps to ensure that Curacao’s dive market is managed sustainably to increase the resilience of corals and marine life to broader global threats and to protect valuable marine ecosystems for future generations.

Coral reefs in Curacao to understand 104 square kilometers (40 square miles) highly biodiverse systems and therefore represent a high economic value.

Learn more about the Green Fins Hub here.

Curaçao Green Turtle Diving (Image credit: Frank Do)
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New Guide to Cultural Tourism of the Northern Plains of Costa Rica: https://ipmsguatemala.org/new-guide-to-cultural-tourism-of-the-northern-plains-of-costa-rica/ Tue, 11 Oct 2022 07:12:24 +0000 https://ipmsguatemala.org/new-guide-to-cultural-tourism-of-the-northern-plains-of-costa-rica/ The Costa Rican Institute of Tourism and the Ministry of Culture and Youth have designed a guide for tourists called “Cultural Tourist Guide to the Northern Plains”. “The Northern Plains offer a wide range of activities and alternatives for tourists; its extensive and inexhaustible list includes national parks such as the Tenorio and Arenal volcanoes, […]]]>

The Costa Rican Institute of Tourism and the Ministry of Culture and Youth have designed a guide for tourists called “Cultural Tourist Guide to the Northern Plains”.

“The Northern Plains offer a wide range of activities and alternatives for tourists; its extensive and inexhaustible list includes national parks such as the Tenorio and Arenal volcanoes, its wetlands, as well as a variety of adventure, wellness, bird watching, relaxation, rural tourism activities , traditional gastronomy, culture, history and a recognized natural richness,” says the guide.

This is an interactive brochure that includes the activities that can be done in Guatuso, Los Chiles, San Carlos and Upala. It also contains special sections for the Bijagua, Caño Negro and La Fortuna communities.

This guide is part of an inter-institutional effort between the Costa Rican Institute of Tourism (ICT), the System of Conservation Areas (SINAC), the Ministry of Culture and Youth, municipalities, chambers of tourism, entrepreneurs tourist and tourist guides, and non-governmental organizations.

Domestic and foreign tourists can have complete and accessible information and learn more about the beauty of the region and the tours available.

William Rodriguez, Minister of Tourism, stressed the importance of having this guide to facilitate the visit of tourists and provide unique travel experiences.

“With this material, traveling and discovering the natural charms of Costa Rica will be more rewarding. Tourists will also carry out activities that will activate the tourism industry while learning more about our culture, our gastronomy and our history,” he mentioned.

Nayuribe Guadamuz, Minister of Culture and Youth, this guide is very important for the cultural and tourism sector, because it will boost tourism.

“For the Ministry of Culture and Youth, this alliance between the tourism and cultural sector is fundamental. It highlights the cultural richness, traditions and tourist attractions of each region. In addition, better service is provided to domestic and international tourists,” she commented.

Ruth Alfaro, Head of ICT Development Department, explained that the Northern Plains offer a wide range of activities such as ecotourism, adventure, rural tourism, wellness and health, visits to indigenous peoples or simply recreation and relaxation.

The guide has sections such as “10 things every tourist should do and see”; a cultural calendar with monthly activities in each zone, such as civic festivals, carnivals and international festivals.

It also includes a tourist and cultural map of the region, emblematic towns, cultural heritage, the history of each site, historic buildings to visit, music, local characters, information on hotels, restaurants, travel agencies, the gastronomy of each place, groups, wellness tourism, protected areas and national parks, beaches, agricultural farms, historical heritage of the region, rural tourism, among other details.

Guides in Spanish can be downloaded at ICT and some VamosTuristear websites

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