Guatemala politics – IPMS Guatemala http://ipmsguatemala.org/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 18:59:15 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://ipmsguatemala.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-61-120x120.png Guatemala politics – IPMS Guatemala http://ipmsguatemala.org/ 32 32 States take action to prevent court from lifting Trump asylum policy | Policy https://ipmsguatemala.org/states-take-action-to-prevent-court-from-lifting-trump-asylum-policy-policy/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 16:44:44 +0000 https://ipmsguatemala.org/states-take-action-to-prevent-court-from-lifting-trump-asylum-policy-policy/ WASHINGTON (AP) — A coalition of conservative-leaning states is making a last-ditch effort to keep in place a Trump-era public health rule that allows many asylum seekers to be turned away at the southern state border -United. Late Monday, the 15 states filed what’s called a motion to intervene — meaning they want to be […]]]>

WASHINGTON (AP) — A coalition of conservative-leaning states is making a last-ditch effort to keep in place a Trump-era public health rule that allows many asylum seekers to be turned away at the southern state border -United.

Late Monday, the 15 states filed what’s called a motion to intervene — meaning they want to be part of the legal process surrounding the public health rule called Title 42.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

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LATAM POLITICS TODAY-Lula offers to host UN climate talks in Brazilian Amazon https://ipmsguatemala.org/latam-politics-today-lula-offers-to-host-un-climate-talks-in-brazilian-amazon/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 15:34:01 +0000 https://ipmsguatemala.org/latam-politics-today-lula-offers-to-host-un-climate-talks-in-brazilian-amazon/ Latest in Latin American politics today: Lula offers to host UN climate talks in the Brazilian Amazon SHARM EL-SHEIKH – Brazilian Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva was warmly welcomed at the COP27 summit in Egypt on Wednesday, where he pledged to re-engage the rainforest nation in the fight against the climate crisis and proposed […]]]>

Latest in Latin American politics today: Lula offers to host UN climate talks in the Brazilian Amazon

SHARM EL-SHEIKH – Brazilian Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva was warmly welcomed at the COP27 summit in Egypt on Wednesday, where he pledged to re-engage the rainforest nation in the fight against the climate crisis and proposed to hold future climate talks at the UN. “I’m here to tell you all here that Brazil is back in the world,” he said at an event alongside the governors of Brazil’s Amazon states.

A leftist who won his third term last month, Lula said he would seek to have Brazil host COP30 in 2025 and aim to place the venue in the Amazon rainforest, rather than the more populated coastal region. . Ecuador explores potential new agreement with IMF for 2023 – Minister

QUITO – The Ecuadorian government is exploring a possible new agreement with the International Monetary Fund (IMF) as part of its 2023 financing plans, which could also see bond issues in international markets, the minister of finance told Reuters. Economics Pablo Arosemena. Ecuador entered into a 27-month credit agreement with the IMF for $6.5 billion in September 2020, which was renegotiated by President Guillermo Lasso and expires at the end of this year.

Lasso’s spending plan for 2023 needs funding worth $7.58 billion, which is expected to come mainly from local debt issuance and loans from multilateral organizations. Cuban president to meet Putin next week in Moscow

Cuban President Miguel Diaz-Canel is due to meet Russian President Vladimir Putin next week in Moscow, the RIA news agency reported on Wednesday, citing the Cuban ambassador. US judge rules COVID-era border deportation order illegal

WASHINGTON, Nov 15 (Reuters) – A U.S. judge ruled on Tuesday that a pandemic-era order used to deport hundreds of thousands of migrants to Mexico was illegal, a ruling that could have major implications for the US border management. In a 49-page opinion, U.S. District Court Judge Emmet Sullivan said the policy was “arbitrary and capricious” and violated federal regulatory law.

The decision will complicate President Joe Biden’s strategy to deter record border crossings. The administration filed an unopposed motion late Tuesday to delay implementation of the decision for five weeks to allow it to move additional resources to the border and coordinate with state and local governments and non-profit organizations. non-profit. Cuba and the United States make progress in migration negotiations, but more is needed, says Cuba

HAVANA — Cuba and the United States are making progress in talks aimed at stemming a migration crisis that saw record numbers of Cubans arrive at the U.S. border last year, but those advances are not enough to stem the tide, said Cuba’s top diplomat at the talks said on Tuesday. Deputy Foreign Minister Carlos Fernandez de Cossio told reporters that despite steps in the right direction, the United States had yet to address the root of the problem.

“We reiterated our concern about (US) measures that encourage illegal emigration,” De Cossio said, citing existing migration policies that prioritize Cubans seeking to enter the United States over those from other countries. nationalities. Guatemalan anti-corruption judge resigns and denounces the manipulation of justice

GUATEMALA CITY — A well-known anti-corruption judge in Guatemala resigned on Tuesday after accusing the judiciary of mismanagement, the latest in a string of resignations that critics blame on President Alejandro Giammattei’s efforts to consolidate power. Miguel Angel Galvez, a judge with two dozen years on the bench focused largely on corruption, organized crime and civil war cases, blasted what he described as a lack of judicial independence in a video posted on his Twitter account. (Compiled by Steven Grattan; edited by Jonathan Oatis)

(This story has not been edited by the Devdiscourse team and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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Judge orders end to Trump-era asylum restrictions at border | Policy https://ipmsguatemala.org/judge-orders-end-to-trump-era-asylum-restrictions-at-border-policy/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 22:44:13 +0000 https://ipmsguatemala.org/judge-orders-end-to-trump-era-asylum-restrictions-at-border-policy/ SAN DIEGO (AP) — A federal judge on Tuesday ordered the Biden administration to lift Trump-era asylum restrictions that have been a cornerstone of border enforcement since COVID-19 began. U.S. District Judge Emmet Sullivan ruled in Washington that the app must stop immediately for families and single adults, saying it violates federal rule-making procedures. However, […]]]>

SAN DIEGO (AP) — A federal judge on Tuesday ordered the Biden administration to lift Trump-era asylum restrictions that have been a cornerstone of border enforcement since COVID-19 began.

U.S. District Judge Emmet Sullivan ruled in Washington that the app must stop immediately for families and single adults, saying it violates federal rule-making procedures.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

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JRS Advocacy Director meets AUC policy students – https://ipmsguatemala.org/jrs-advocacy-director-meets-auc-policy-students/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 01:23:13 +0000 https://ipmsguatemala.org/jrs-advocacy-director-meets-auc-policy-students/ Image courtesy of Jesuit Refugee Services USA By Justin Lamoureux Students of Dr. Love’s course in Global Issues (POL 307) recently heard a prominent voice in the humanitarian community. Giulia McPherson is the Advocacy Director of Jesuit Refugee Service United States: a non-governmental organization founded by the Society of Jesus, and currently operates in fifty […]]]>

Image courtesy of Jesuit Refugee Services USA

By Justin Lamoureux

Students of Dr. Love’s course in Global Issues (POL 307) recently heard a prominent voice in the humanitarian community. Giulia McPherson is the Advocacy Director of Jesuit Refugee Service United States: a non-governmental organization founded by the Society of Jesus, and currently operates in fifty different countries. Talk to the class on Zoom video call, McPherson spoke at length about the organization’s efforts to meet the educational, health and social needs of nearly one million refugees each year. With my classmates Brian Melendez and Keenan Green, I facilitated the engagement to help start a constructive dialogue on their topic of interest: the humanitarian issues plaguing the so-called “North Triangle” in Central America.

Few Americans would question the relevance of migration as a political (or humanitarian) issue. It seems like every day, news headlines feature stories about the increased global prevalence of migration or the humanitarian crises that inspire such trends.

It is no secret that in recent years the scale of migration to the United States from Central America has increased dramatically. Between 1990 and 2020, the number of migrants from Central American countries increased by 137%. Two of the countries that have seen the greatest increase in external migration are Honduras (530%) and Guatemala (293%): both of which are considered part of the Northern Triangle. The third state in this particular region – El Salvador – also saw a much smaller (but nonetheless substantial) increase in 29% in the last three decades.

In addition to a broad overview of the humanitarian work routinely carried out by Jesuit refugee services, McPherson gave students insight into the ongoing crises which led to greater migration from the Northern Triangle. In addition to economic reasons, push factors in recent years have included gang violence and recruitment, gender-based violence, lack of economic opportunity, environmental challenges (i.e. climate change) ; and the decline of the rule of law.

McPherson also offered a plus detailed look how the demography of migrants has changed in recent years. In 2022, for the first time in history, migrants from the Northern Triangle outnumbered Venezuelans, Cubans and Nicaraguans at border crossings between the United States and Mexico. She also discussed US asylum policies and how they have evolved over the past decades. In particular, she explained how the migrant crisis has been exacerbated by restrictive protocols enacted under the former Trump administration and out of necessity during the COVID-19 pandemic. Interestingly, these new constraints prompted many residents of the Northern Triangle to seek protection from other countries, including Mexico.

In addition to viewing the presentation, students were asked to complete a short survey at the beginning and end of the course to test their knowledge of the Northern Triangle and the issues facing this region. It soon became clear that such an event resonated with those present. Junior history major Rebekah Rowe felt that this event “did a great job of making the issue of immigration very tangible” and appreciated that McPherson “was able to share personal stories about the struggles experienced in the Northern Triangle. , as well as (to) try to leave the area.” Indeed, Rowe left the classroom with a new sense of urgency to dedicate his time “to helping those who have moved to America, particularly with the process of obtaining legal documents which becomes more difficult”.

Senior policy officer Brian Melendez said he was inspired to lead this project by his personal ties to El Salvador: “I wanted to better understand the issues people face in this region that cause them to leave their homeland, and the involvement of the United States. foreign policy in the region,” he said. Melendez also noted that in Global Issues, “we learned about the importance of Catholic organizations that provide relief services around the world.” For him, hearing about Jesuit services for refugees – and Mrs. McPherson’s efforts, in particular – “illustrates this point”, allowing him “to gain insight into the evolution of refugees, asylum seekers and migrants from Latin America”.

After an in-depth examination of the humanitarian issues affecting the Northern Triangle – and what Jesuit refugee services, as well as United States government policies, are doing to address them – McPherson concluded his presentation by examining different ways in which members of the public could get involved with the advocacy work of his organization. In particular, Catholic University students are encouraged to reach out to policy makers and implore them to support initiatives that would protect Ukrainian and Afghan refugees, and take action for displaced Venezuelans. Students should also promote refugee education, refugee resettlement, and prioritize refugee mental health.

Above all, this event and the project that accompanies it represent a decisive call to action. Our responsibility to engage in efforts to facilitate meaningful change in the Northern Triangle – and to provide assistance to migrants in this region – serves to embody two of our core identities. As Catholics, we have a moral obligation to “welcome the stranger” (Matthew 25:35), to respect the dignity of all human beings, and to help innocent victims of persecution. The Catholic Church too taught that all people have the right to live a dignified life in their homeland: it seems normal that we support organizations that are committed to making this possible. As Americans, we have a fundamental call to embrace the weary, poor, and huddled masses who yearn to breathe freely. It is equally important to ensure the accountability of democratically elected officials responsible for creating government policies that subscribe to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. In every sense of the word, this issue transcends all partisan labels – it is a humanitarian crisis that no one can ignore.

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LATAM POLITICS TODAY-Panama judge summons two ex-presidents to court in Odebrecht probe https://ipmsguatemala.org/latam-politics-today-panama-judge-summons-two-ex-presidents-to-court-in-odebrecht-probe/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 17:05:40 +0000 https://ipmsguatemala.org/latam-politics-today-panama-judge-summons-two-ex-presidents-to-court-in-odebrecht-probe/ Breaking news in Latin American politics today: A Panamanian judge summons two ex-presidents to court in the Odebrecht investigation PANAMA CITY — A Panamanian judge on Tuesday called on two former presidents, along with a list of other high-profile figures, to stand trial for money laundering related to the Odebrecht corruption probe, a sweeping investigation […]]]>

Breaking news in Latin American politics today: A Panamanian judge summons two ex-presidents to court in the Odebrecht investigation

PANAMA CITY — A Panamanian judge on Tuesday called on two former presidents, along with a list of other high-profile figures, to stand trial for money laundering related to the Odebrecht corruption probe, a sweeping investigation into the corruption that has spread across Latin America. The country’s attorney general’s office said a judge had summoned 36 people on money laundering charges, including six former ministers, former civil servants, businessmen and others.

The trial would begin in August 2023, he said. Mexican President Says Government Cannot Buy GM Corn

MEXICO CITY — The Mexican government can’t buy yellow corn from the United States because it doesn’t want genetically modified (GM) corn, President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador said Wednesday. The United States wanted to sell more yellow corn to Mexico and Mexico refused, Lopez Obrador said at a regular press conference.

“There’s a market for it but the government can’t make a purchase because we don’t want GM,” Lopez Obrador said, citing the lack of scientific investigation into its effects. “We are a sovereign and free country,” he added. Peruvian Prime Minister challenges Congress in new clash between state powers

LIMA — Peru’s prime minister on Tuesday night challenged the legislature to a vote of confidence, again heightening tensions between state powers in the Andean nation, which has been plagued by political wrangling for years. Peru’s leftist government, led by embattled President Pedro Castillo, has been at odds with the opposition-led Congress since the two powers took office last July amid a polarized political backdrop.

“Since the start of this presidential term, we have found ourselves in a deep political crisis which is nothing but the result of the fragility of our parties and our representative systems,” Prime Minister Anibal Torres said in a statement. a letter calling for a vote of confidence. The United States criticizes the measures taken against Guatemalan judges and prosecutors

WASHINGTON/GUATEMALA CITY – A senior U.S. government official on Tuesday night criticized what he described as troubling moves against Guatemalan judges and prosecutors overseeing corruption and human rights cases, criticisms the government Guatemalan dismissed as misinformed. The rebuke from US State Department spokesman Ned Price comes as the government of conservative Guatemalan President Alejandro Giammattei has jailed anti-corruption judges and prosecutors, while still others have fled the Central American country . (Compiled by Steven Grattan; Editing by Lisa Shumaker)

(This story has not been edited by the Devdiscourse team and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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How Millennials Are Changing Latin American Politics https://ipmsguatemala.org/how-millennials-are-changing-latin-american-politics/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://ipmsguatemala.org/how-millennials-are-changing-latin-american-politics/ Speakers: Andrea Moncadajournalist and political analyst Samuel PerezMember of Congress, Guatemala Brian Winter, Vice President of Policy, AS/COA; Chief Editor, Quarterly Americas Louise Francopodcast editor and producer, Quarterly Americas (moderator) Quarterly Americasin partnership with the Young Professionals of the Americas, hosted How Millennials Are Changing Latin American Politics at AS/COA headquarters in New York on […]]]>

Speakers:

  • Andrea Moncadajournalist and political analyst
  • Samuel PerezMember of Congress, Guatemala
  • Brian Winter, Vice President of Policy, AS/COA; Chief Editor, Quarterly Americas
  • Louise Francopodcast editor and producer, Quarterly Americas (moderator)

Quarterly Americasin partnership with the Young Professionals of the Americas, hosted How Millennials Are Changing Latin American Politics at AS/COA headquarters in New York on November 2, 2022 to launch QAthe latest special report from on millennia in politics. Andrea Moncada interviewed a dozen millennial politicians for his cover story in this issue and observed that they shared a sense of frustration with unfulfilled promises of greater economic prosperity and a better quality of life, but expressed a desire for incremental change, not ‘a revolution. Samuel Perez spoke about his experience as a young politician, noting that democratic deficits and irregular campaign funding in Guatemala and across the region are among the many barriers to young people entering politics. Panelists recommended that Millennial politicians look to their elders for lessons on building consensus and to Gen Z for their effective messaging on the streets and on social media.

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Indiana GOP touts candidate’s brief military service in ads | Policy https://ipmsguatemala.org/indiana-gop-touts-candidates-brief-military-service-in-ads-policy/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 19:49:46 +0000 https://ipmsguatemala.org/indiana-gop-touts-candidates-brief-military-service-in-ads-policy/ An ad that began airing this week and another that highlights Morales as an Army veteran are being paid for by the state’s Republican Party as it makes a push ahead of the Nov. 8 election to keep GOP control of the Secretary of State’s office despite criticism of Morales as a 2020 “election denier” […]]]>

An ad that began airing this week and another that highlights Morales as an Army veteran are being paid for by the state’s Republican Party as it makes a push ahead of the Nov. 8 election to keep GOP control of the Secretary of State’s office despite criticism of Morales as a 2020 “election denier” and for ousted twice from menial jobs in this office.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

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Human rights are under attack. Who will protect them? https://ipmsguatemala.org/human-rights-are-under-attack-who-will-protect-them/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://ipmsguatemala.org/human-rights-are-under-attack-who-will-protect-them/ Globally, human rights continue to be under attack, whether by populist movements desperate to gain power or by authoritarian governments eager to maintain it. Technology has opened up new frontiers for sharing dissenting ideas across borders, but also for governments to limit the ability of their citizens to express them. And broad assaults are underway […]]]>

Globally, human rights continue to be under attack, whether by populist movements desperate to gain power or by authoritarian governments eager to maintain it. Technology has opened up new frontiers for sharing dissenting ideas across borders, but also for governments to limit the ability of their citizens to express them. And broad assaults are underway against institutions such as the International Criminal Court, which was created not just to provide a remedy for victims of rights abuses, but to set an international benchmark for human rights. Instead, respect for human rights is replaced by dangerous intolerance.

Around the world, authoritarian populists have built their movements by demonizing minorities. In Brazil, for example, President Jair Bolsonaro, who just lost his re-election bid, reveled in his provocations, challenging women’s rights as well as those of LGBTQ and indigenous communities. In Poland, incumbent President Andrzej Duda ran for re-election in 2020 – and won – on an explicitly anti-LGBTQ platform. And even Peru’s new left-wing president, Pedro Castillo, has demonized activists for gender equality and LGBTQ rights, despite championing an ostensibly progressive economic agenda.

Meanwhile, in China, the central government is waging an organized campaign in Xinjiang to strip the predominantly Muslim Uighur population of their cultural identity, including through the use of concentration camps and forced labor. And in Venezuela, President Nicolas Maduro’s government was recently accused by UN Human Rights Council investigators of committing crimes against humanity, targeting political dissidents through arbitrary detentions, torture and extrajudicial executions.

At the same time, the populist rise has reinvigorated civil society efforts to protect historically marginalized communities, including members of the LGBTQ community, religious minorities and Indigenous groups. And with the emergence of a tougher line towards China in the United States, but also in Europe, governments are beginning to impose sanctions on Chinese officials and companies implicated in abuses in Xinjiang.

WPR has covered human rights issues in detail and continues to review key issues on new developments. What are the most effective ways to protect human rights and what additional measures could be taken? What role will technology play in both preserving and limiting human rights? And how will changes in the international order and global balance of power affect the human rights landscape?

Our most recent coverage:

The killing of Palestinian journalist Shireen Abu Akleh by the Israeli army in May was widely reported and denounced internationally and regionally. But international media and the public have paid little attention to the broader problem of intimidation, threats and targeting faced by Palestinian journalists.

Political dissent and freedom of the press

The resurgence of populist authoritarian regimes around the world has weighed on a range of democracy-related freedoms, including freedom of speech, freedom to express political dissent and freedom of the press. In addition to facing repression and arrests, government critics and the press are increasingly targeted by so-called fake news laws that are often used as a cover for censorship. At the same time, new spyware technologies have made surveillance more effective and more accessible to repressive regimes that are used to silencing their critics.

Indigenous rights

As indigenous communities come under attack around the world, disputes over resource extraction have become a critical fault line, especially in Latin America. Elsewhere, political and economic marginalization continues to pose difficult challenges.

Women’s rights and gender equality

While women’s rights have made great strides around the world in terms of legal protection, in practice women continue to face challenges ranging from violence and wage discrimination to unfair family law and social customs. Despite some recent victories, gender equality around the world remains far from a reality. And in places where women had made progress in expanding their rights, they suffered recent setbacks – the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision to overturn Roe v. Wade who guaranteed the right to abortion being an excellent example.

Religious and ethnic minorities

The attacks of recent years in the United States, New Zealand and Sri Lanka bear witness to a worrying rise in violent intolerance against religious minorities. But even where violence remains the exception to the rule, protections for religious minorities around the world are often more de jure than de facto. Meanwhile, the rise of the movement protesting against police violence against black people in the United States and Europe has put racism in the spotlight around the world.

LGBTQ rights

Despite the gradual introduction of protections for members of the LGBTQ community in some countries, they remain under threat in much of the world. Meanwhile, the rise of populist movements in Europe and elsewhere has challenged the earlier gains of LGBTQ activists.

Editor’s note: This article was originally published in May 2019 and is regularly updated.

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Taking stock of gender-based violence in Canadian politics https://ipmsguatemala.org/taking-stock-of-gender-based-violence-in-canadian-politics/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 16:42:16 +0000 https://ipmsguatemala.org/taking-stock-of-gender-based-violence-in-canadian-politics/ Quebec Liberal Marwah Rizqy speaks during a press conference as Liberal Leader Dominique Anglade, left, looks on in August 2022 in St-Agapit, Quebec. Rizqy received repeated death threats, resulting in the arrest of a man. THE CANADIAN PRESS / Jacques Boissinot Five years ago, women around the world began to publicly disclose their experiences of […]]]>

Quebec Liberal Marwah Rizqy speaks during a press conference as Liberal Leader Dominique Anglade, left, looks on in August 2022 in St-Agapit, Quebec. Rizqy received repeated death threats, resulting in the arrest of a man. THE CANADIAN PRESS / Jacques Boissinot

Five years ago, women around the world began to publicly disclose their experiences of sexual assault and harassment on social media using the hashtag #MeToo.

This step gives us the opportunity to reflect on how Canada has handled its own supposed #MeToo account and misogyny in Canadian politics specifically.

The events of 2017 occurred 11 years later Tarana Burke founded the #MeToo movement to raise awareness of the violence black women and girls experience in the United States. The #MeToo hashtag went viral in October 2017 after allegations of sexual misconduct against Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein went public.

Five years later, what lessons have we learned about gender-based violence in Canadian politics?

The first is that violence and harassment have not diminished; on the contrary, they have intensified in the Canadian political sphere.

In response to the growing threats and security concerns of parliamentarians, the the Minister of Public Security announced in June 2022 that all MPs would receive “panic buttons” to increase their personal security.

During the 2021 federal election, analyzes of tweets received by incumbent candidates and party leaders conducted by the Samara Center for Democracy show that 19% were probably toxic, meaning they were uncivil, insulting, hostile, threatening or profane.

While public servants from all walks of life are targeted, women, Indigenous, Black, racialized and queer politicians are bear the weight current attacks on Canadian democracy.

Freeland docked

In August 2022, a man cornered Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland and his all-female entourage in an elevator at City Hall in Grande Prairie, Alberta. and hurled insults and curses at him.

The incident prompted other female politicians to speak out about their own experiences of harassment.

Calgary Mayor Jyoti Gondek shared his experiences harassment on Twitter, while Quebec Liberal MP Marwah Rizqy went public with the recent harassment and threats made against her.

Rizqy has received death threats, including from a man who allegedly called the police to tell them where they could locate his murdered body. She was pregnant at the time.

A few weeks later, an online harassment campaign directed against women journalists — many of whom are racialized — was ongoing.

Threatening with violence

In all of these cases, the harassers invoked violent, misogynistic and racist language, imagery or paraphernalia as a means of demeaning, intimidating and threatening their targets.

We have also learned that some political leaders seem willing to use the vitriol seeded in our political culture for partisan ends.

Conservative Leader Pierre Poilievre rises during Question Period in the House of Commons in October 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Conservative Leader Pierre Poilievre rises during Question Period in the House of Commons in October 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

In October 2022, Global News reported that a hidden misogynistic label was placed on 50 of Conservative Leader Pierre Poilievre’s most recent YouTube videos.

The hashtag, “MGTOW” (men go their own way)refers to an online anti-feminist movement that advocates male supremacy.

Pressed on the subject, Poilievre condemned all forms of misogyny but did not apologize.

Silence and exclusion

Academic research shows that when harassment is directed against women politicians, employees, activists and journalists because they are women, it constitutes a threat to democracy.

Mona Lena Krook, political scientist from Rutgers University argued that the purpose of violence against women in politics is to silence them and exclude them from public life.

As my research As Cheryl Collier of the University of Windsor points out, political violence and harassment are barriers for women in Canadian politics and undermine democratic values ​​such as equal representation and participation.

Read more: Another obstacle for women in politics: violence

After the 2021 federal election, women held 30.5% of seats in the House of Commons. Today Canada ranks 61st out of 190 countries in the political representation of women.

Female foreign ministers, including Chrystia Freeland, Canada's then foreign minister, pose for a photo at a conference in Montreal in 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

Female foreign ministers, including Chrystia Freeland, Canada’s then foreign minister, pose for a photo at a conference in Montreal in 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

Positive developments

Fortunately, not all lessons from #MeToo have been negative, and positive progress for Canadian women has been made.

In 2018, the federal Liberal government passed a new law, Bill C-65, which updates and strengthens existing legislation to prevent and address harassment and violence in all federally regulated workplaces. This includes Parliament.

In response to Bill C-65, the House of Commons and the Senate updated their policies in 2021 to prevent and address violence and harassment.

Since #MeToo, many provincial and territorial legislatures have also adopted codes of conduct or policies to address sexual harassment.

While these codes and policies are insufficient and further action is needed, media and public attention to workplace harassment and violence since #MeToo has spurred change in these legislatures.

A large crowd gathers in Nathan Phillips Square for the start of the Toronto Women's March in January 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Tijana Martin

A large crowd gathers in Nathan Phillips Square for the start of the Toronto Women’s March in January 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Tijana Martin

But more needs to be done. Non-disclosure agreements (NDAs) in cases of harassment and violence must be banned in all organizations and workplaces, including legislatures. However, banning NDAs alone will not stop unethical behavior.

As my research with Collier’s shows, political institutions — which remain predominantly white, cisgender, and male-dominated — must do more to uproot their sexist and exclusive cultures.

Legislators must adopt strategies to disrupt the “networks of complicitythat protect powerful perpetrators and enable abusive behavior. Completely impartial and transparent processes that address all forms of violence and impose strong penalties on those who commit acts of violence or harassment would help.

Attack on democracy

Harassment of journalists, political candidates, staff and elected officials by a small fraction of the public must also be addressed.

An attack on a politician must be seen as an attack on Canadian democracy and should not be tolerated in a free and democratic society.

Finally, political parties must do better to recruit and elect diverse people to public office.

When the 10th anniversary of the #MeToo movement arrives in 2027, Canadian democracy will hopefully be strengthened by the actions we take today to end violence and harassment in politics.

This article is republished from The conversation, an independent non-profit news site dedicated to sharing ideas from academic experts. It was written by: Tracey Raney, Metropolitan University of Toronto. Like this article ? Subscribe to our weekly newsletter.

Read more:

Tracey Raney receives funding from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.

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How Evangelicals are Transforming Politics in Latin America https://ipmsguatemala.org/how-evangelicals-are-transforming-politics-in-latin-america/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://ipmsguatemala.org/how-evangelicals-are-transforming-politics-in-latin-america/ The spread of evangelical Christianity is changing politics in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Bolivia, and elsewhere in Latin America. In this episode of The Americas Quarterly Podcast, we examine how far this has gone in a number of countries, from Brazil to Guatemala, and what this means for future elections in the region. Our guest, Professor […]]]>

The spread of evangelical Christianity is changing politics in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Bolivia, and elsewhere in Latin America. In this episode of The Americas Quarterly Podcast, we examine how far this has gone in a number of countries, from Brazil to Guatemala, and what this means for future elections in the region. Our guest, Professor Taylor Boas, is the author of Evangelicals and electoral politics in Latin America: a kingdom of this world, which is expected to be released in February. Professor Boas argues that we are likely to see a stronger alliance between Evangelicals and Catholics, and that while there have been electoral successes, Evangelicals may actually lose the culture wars in the region.

Listen to this episode and subscribe The Americas Quarterly Podcast on Apple, Spotify, Google and sound cloud

Guest:

Taylor C. Boas is Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Political Science at Boston University

Host:

Louise Franco is a publisher, writer and producer of podcasts at Quarterly Americas

Further reading:

For Latin American evangelicals, Bolsonaro is just the start by Amy Erica Smith

Brazil’s evangelical left by Ana Ionova

Lima’s new mayor looks like a Peruvian Bolsonaro by Will Freeman

QA Podcast | Surprising election in Brazil: what’s next?

Key words: QA Podcast, Brazil, Brazilian elections, central America, Chile, evangelicals, Peru, Religion

Do you like what you read? Subscribe to AQ for more.

The opinions expressed in this article do not necessarily reflect those of Quarterly Americas or its publishers.

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